Search for "Charlottetown Accord"

Displaying 41-60 of 98 results
Article

James Bagnall

James Bagnall, printer, publisher, politician, officeholder (b at Shelburne, NS 1783; d at Bedeque, PEI 20 June 1855). The son of New York LOYALISTS, he moved with his parents to Charlottetown as an infant.

Article

Arthur Peters

Arthur Peters, lawyer, premier of PEI (b at Charlottetown 29 Aug 1854; d there 29 Jan 1908), brother of Frederick Peters. Called to the Prince Edward Island Bar in 1878, Peters was first elected to the Assembly in 1890 as a Liberal.

Article

Donald Farquharson

Donald Farquharson, politician, premier of PEI (b at Mermaid, PEI 27 July 1834; d at Charlottetown 26 June 1903). A teacher by training, Farquharson subsequently entered the wholesale and shipping business and in 1876 won election to the PEI Assembly as a Liberal.

Article

Aubin-Edmond Arsenault

Aubin-Edmond Arsenault, lawyer, politician, premier of PEI (b at Egmont Bay, PEI 28 July 1870; d at Charlottetown 29 Apr 1968). In 1917 Arsenault became premier of the Island, the first Acadian premier of any Canadian province.

Article

Frederick Peters

Frederick Peters, lawyer, premier of PEI (b at Charlottetown 8 Apr 1852; d at Prince Rupert, BC 29 July 1919). A brother of Arthur PETERS, Frederick was elected to the assembly in 1890 as a Liberal and became premier 22 April 1891, serving until resigning on 27 October 1897.

Article

John Whitney Pickersgill

John Whitney Pickersgill, public servant, politician, historian (b at Wyecombe, Ont 23 June 1905; d at Ottawa 14 Nov 1997). "Clear it with Jack" was the Ottawa watchword through the KING and ST. LAURENT eras, a testimony to Pickersgill's extraordinary influence.

Article

John Black Aird

John Black Aird, lawyer, senator, corporate director and lieutenant governor (b at Toronto 5 May 1923; d there 6 May 1995). Following graduation from Osgoode Hall Law School, Aird joined a Toronto law firm which currently bears his name.

Article

John Herbert Turner

John Herbert Turner, businessman, politician, premier of BC 1895-98 (b at Claydon, Eng 7 May 1834; d at Richmond, Eng 9 Dec 1923). A merchant in Halifax and Charlottetown, Turner moved in 1862 to Victoria, where in 1865 he established the firm of Turner, Beeton and Co.

Article

James Bardin Palmer

James Bardin Palmer, lawyer, politician (b at Dublin, Ire c 1771; d at Charlottetown 3 Mar 1833). Trained as a lawyer in Ireland, Palmer immigrated to Prince Edward Island in 1802. He quickly embroiled himself in politics and became a leading member of the LOYAL ELECTORS.

Article

Fathers of Confederation

Thirty-six men are traditionally regarded as the Fathers of Confederation. They represented the British North American colonies at one or more of the conferences that led to Confederation and the creation of the Dominion of Canada. These meetings included the Charlottetown Conference (September 1864), the Quebec Conference (October 1864) and the London Conference (December 1866 to March 1867). Beyond the original 36 men, the subject of who should be included among the Fathers of Confederation has been a matter of some debate. The definition can be expanded to include those who were instrumental in the creation of Manitoba, bringing British Columbia and Newfoundland into Confederation, and the creation of Nunavut. (See also  Fathers of Confederation: Table.)

Macleans

Jack Pickersgill (Obituary)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 24, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

In the late 1930s, when Jack Pickersgill was a freshly minted civil servant in Ottawa, he decided to take a motorcycle trip to the United States. When he arrived at the border, a customs official asked him to prove his Canadian citizenship by naming his place of birth.

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Great Coalition of 1864

The politics of the Province of Canada in the early 1860s were marked by instability and deadlock. The Great Coalition of 1864 proved to be a turning point in Canadian history. It proved remarkably successful in breaking the logjam of central Canadian politics and in helping to create a new country. The coalition united Reformers and Conservatives in the cause of constitutional reform. It paved the way for the Charlottetown Conference and Confederation.  

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Jean J. Charest

Jean J. Charest, lawyer, politician, premier of Québec from 2003 to 2012 (born at Sherbrooke, Qué, 24 June 1958). Charest received both his undergraduate degree and a degree in law at Sherbrooke University. He was first elected as Member of Parliament for Sherbrooke in 1984.

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Willie Adams

Willie Adams, Inuk, Liberal senator, businessman, electrician (born 22 June 1934 in Kuujjuaq [then Fort Chimo] in Nunavik, Quebec). As Canada’s first Inuit senator, Adams frequently sought greater federal government support for his people in education, health care, infrastructure, land claims, fishery allocations and affordable food, housing and fuel. He was actively involved in the creation of Nunavut and supported Inuit language rights, art and culture, and traditional hunting methods such as sealing.

Article

Jack Layton

Jack Layton, educator, politician, and federal New Democratic Party leader, was born at Montréal, 18 July 1950. He was the son of Robert Layton, a former prominent Québec Liberal who later became a Conservative MP and cabinet minister.