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Canadian Ski Marathon

In 1967 several hundred cross-country skiers led by former Canadian National Ski team member, Don MacLeod, celebrated the Centennial year by skiing 100 miles (160 km) from Montréal to Ottawa.

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Hunting

In Canada, hunting at will for food is possible for Indigenous peoples belonging to groups that obtained that right when they ceded lands under treaty, and for Indigenous peoples belonging to other groups by virtue of acknowledged aboriginal title.

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Speed Skating

Speed-skating races are held for men and women both indoors and outdoors. Outdoor races are held on open-air oval tracks 400 m in length. Two competitors race in separate lanes against the clock, changing lanes at each lap so that both skaters go the same distance.

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Queen's Plate

Politicians lobbied to hold the race in their constituencies in the early years. It was raced in Ontario at Toronto, Guelph, St Catharines, Whitby, Kingston, Barrie, Woodstock, Picton, London, Hamilton and Ottawa before it settled permanently, with the Queen's approval, in Toronto in 1883.

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Figure Skating

Figure skating is a sport that tests style and technical skill. The most important championships are the Olympic Games and the World, European and Four Continents Championships. The Grand Prix Series consists of six senior international events, including Skate Canada (first staged in 1973). Many Canadian figure skaters have achieved distinction at the international level by winning championships and medals; several have entered the record books by being the first to successfully perform challenging new jumps.

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Schenley Awards

Schenley Awards, emblematic of excellence in Canadian professional football, were originally created to honour the most outstanding player in the CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE in 1953. That year Billy Vessels of the Edmonton Eskimos became the first recipient.

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Ski Jumping

Although informal ski jumping had taken place for decades, the first officially measured jump (30.5 m) was made by Sondre Norheim in Norway in 1860. About 20 years later, Scandinavian miners and lumbermen brought the sport to western Canada, where it flourished.

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Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing is a form of physical activity that uses two wooden-frame "shoes," each strung together with interlaced webbing, to walk or run over snow.

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Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, in Regina, captures the rich sports history of the province. It was established in 1966 to honour outstanding athletes, championship teams and sports personalities. Its present location, the old land titles building, is protected as a heritage site by the province.

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Solitaire

Solitaire is the common name for 13 species of New World thrushes, one of which occurs in Canada.

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Roller Sports

Roller sports offer a wide range of recreational and competitive activities, utilizing either traditional or inline skates.

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Royal St John's Regatta

The Prince of Wales, later Edward VII, visited in 1860 and offered £100 to the winner. Times improved in the late 19th century, and in 1901 a crew from Outer Cove set a record time, 9:13.75, that was not broken until 1981 (the crew has been elected to the CANADA SPORTS HALL OF FAME).

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Ringette in Canada

Ringette is a skating sport played on ice using a straight stick and a hollow rubber ring. The sport was invented in Canada and is now played in countries around the world. During the 2015–16 season, there were over 30,000 registered ringette players in Canada.

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Canada at the Paralympic Games

The Paralympic Games are an international competition for elite athletes with a disability. The name comes from "para," as in "parallel" or "equal." Like the Olympics, the Paralympic Games take place every two years, alternating between summer and winter sports. The country hosting the Olympic Games also hosts the Paralympics. Canada has participated in the Paralympic Games since 1968.