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Football

For many years, the term football described the practice of kicking an object, usually a round ball, and directing it into a designated goal area.

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Toronto FC

Toronto FC (also known as TFC or “The Reds”) is a men’s professional soccer team that plays in Major League Soccer (MLS). Founded in 2006 by Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment, the club has won the Voyageurs Cup seven times (2009–2012 and 2016–18). They have made it to the MLS playoffs three times (2015, 2016 and 2017), becoming the first Canadian club to reach the MLS Cup final in 2016 and the first to win the MLS Cup in 2017. TFC has competed in the CONCACAF Champions League five times, making it as far as the finals in 2018. The club is one of three MLS franchises in Canada, including Montreal Impact and Vancouver Whitecaps FC.

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Tennis

Modern tennis almost certainly originated in France in the 11th century as a form of handball called le jeu de paume. The game, also called "court tennis" or "real tennis," was played on an indoor court - originally in a monastery - with a ball, and by 1500 a racquet was introduced.

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Bicycling

Velocipede rinks were built from Halifax to Toronto and rented bicycles and lessons were provided. There was an exhibition of riding that year in the Mechanics Hall in St John's, Nfld, and cyclists in Victoria, BC, held races in Beacon Hill Park.

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Biathlon

Biathlon is a sport that combines competitive, free-technique movement and marksmanship. The word biathlon is of Greek origin and means "two tests."

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Speed Swimming

Swimming was considered to be an important survival skill by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans but was not contested as a sport.

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Club de Foot Montréal

Club de Foot Montréal (also CF Montréal, CFM or CFMTL) is a men’s professional soccer team  that plays in Major League Soccer (MLS). The club was founded as L’Impact de Montréal or the Montreal Impact in 1992. It changed its name and brand identity on 14 January 2020. The team plays at Stade Saputo in Montreal and is operated by the Saputo family (see Lino Saputo). L’Impact played in various professional soccer leagues before joining MLS for the 2012 season. L’Impact won the Voyageurs Cup six times (2002–07) and the Canadian Championship three times (2008, 2013, 2014). The club has made it to MLS playoffs three times (2013, 2015, 2016), getting as far as the Eastern Conference finals in 2016. In 2015, they became the first Canadian club to reach the CONCACAF Champions League final. Club de Foot Montréal is one of three MLS franchises in Canada, including Toronto FC and Vancouver Whitecaps FC.


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Canada at the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

The 1960 Olympic Winter Games were held in Squaw Valley, California, from 18 to 28 February 1960. Canada sent 44 athletes (34 men, 10 women) and finished eighth in the overall medal count with four medals (two gold, one silver and one bronze). Anne Heggtveit won gold in the slalom, becoming the first Canadian Olympic ski champion. Robert Paul and Barbara Wagner dominated the pairs figure skating competition in their second Winter Games, while Donald Jackson added a bronze medal in men’s figure skating. The Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen represented Canada in the Olympic hockey tournament and finished second to the Americans. It was the last time Canada was represented by a club team in Olympic hockey.

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Automobile Racing

The earliest automobile racing took the form of speed trials and tours. In 1900 F.S. Evans set a record of 3 hrs, 20 min, driving an automobile the 60 km between Toronto and Hamilton.

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Snowboarding

Snowboarding is the sport of riding a large flat ski downhill over snow. Unlike downhill skiing, snowboarding does not require the use of poles and both feet are placed sideways on the same board. A relative newcomer to the family of winter sports, snowboarding began to gain popularity in the 1960s and rose in status from the latest "gimmick" to an accredited Olympic event in 1998, a relatively short period of time. Canadians have had great success over the years in international snowboarding at the Olympic Winter Games, Winter X Games and World Snowboarding Championships. Eight Canadian snowboarders have won Olympic medals — Ross Rebagliati, Dominique Maltais, Mike Robertson, Maëlle Ricker, Jasey-Jay Anderson, Mark McMorris, Max Parrot and Laurie Blouin. Rebagliati, Ricker and Anderson won Olympic gold, while Maltais and McMorris are multiple medallists.

Macleans

Breaking the ice

How an astounding finish transformed the world’s perceptions of women’s hockey, lifting it from second-tier status to a phenomenon that will forever enrich Canada’s rich sports mythology.

Macleans

Curling: Special Report

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 16, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Sean O'Hare is a little nervous as he stares through the windows of the Fort Simpson Curling Club at the action on the ice below. It is clear that he is trying to figure out just what exactly the people are doing with the rocks and brooms.

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Speed Skating

Speed-skating races are held for men and women both indoors and outdoors. Outdoor races are held on open-air oval tracks 400 m in length. Two competitors race in separate lanes against the clock, changing lanes at each lap so that both skaters go the same distance.

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Competitive Cycling in Canada

Bicycle racing comprises many events, from short-distance sprints on banked velodromes to road races covering distances of 30 to over 5,000 km, as well as mountain bike, BMX and para-cycling competitions. Canadians have made their mark in international cycling, including podium finishes at major competitions like the Olympics/Paralympics and world championships.

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Canada at the Paralympic Games

The Paralympic Games are an international competition for elite athletes with a disability. The name comes from "para," as in "parallel" or "equal." Like the Olympics, the Paralympic Games take place every two years, alternating between summer and winter sports. The country hosting the Olympic Games also hosts the Paralympics. Canada has participated in the Paralympic Games since 1968.

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Hockey Night in Canada

Hockey Night in Canada (HNIC) is a weekly Saturday night broadcast of National Hockey League (NHL) games. It is Canada’s longest-running television program and the Guinness World Record holder as the longest-running TV sports program. It was first broadcast on the radio in Montreal and Toronto as General Motors Hockey Broadcast on 12 November 1931, with play-by-play by iconic sports broadcaster Foster Hewitt. The first televised airing of HNIC — one of Canada’s earliest television broadcasts — was on 11 October 1952. The program was produced by the CBC from 1936 until 2013, when the rights to broadcast NHL games were acquired by Rogers Communications. A staple of Canadian television for more than half a century, HNIC has long been the country’s highest-rated series. It regularly averaged more than 2 million viewers for decades. Recent seasons have averaged around 1.3 million viewers per episode. The theme music is seen by many as Canada’s second national anthem. The series has won 21 Gemini Awards and three Canadian Screen Awards.