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Article

Weber Piano Company Ltd.

Weber Piano Company Ltd. Manufacturers of grand, square, and upright pianos, founded as Messrs Weber & Co in Market Square, Kingston, Ont, in 1871. The firm also sold parlour organs and melodeons by other makers. Weber succeeded an earlier piano manufacturer, John C.

Article

"Song for the Mira"

“Song for the Mira” is a contemporary folk song in the Celtic style, written in 1973 by Allister MacGillivray. Its lyrics speak of a longing for, and eventual return to, the serenity of the Mira River region of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Brought to international attention by Anne Murray and covered more than 300 times, the song has become a standard in the Celtic repertoire and something of an anthem in Nova Scotia.

Article

Folklore

Folklore was first introduced as a term in England in 1846 and today refers to information, wisdom and human expression that is passed on, usually anonymously, from generation to generation or transmitted and circulated as traditional cultural behaviour.

Article

Cello

Cello. The bass of the violin family ('basso di violino') was made in the early 1600s, but it was not until the 18th century that it was recognized as a potential solo instrument, ideal string quartet bass, and orchestral instrument.

Article

Casavant Frères

 Casavant Frères is the most important and illustrious organ-building firm in Canada. It was founded in St-Hyacinthe, Qué, in 1879 by the brothers Joseph-Claver (b 1855, d 1933) and Samuel-Marie (b 1859, d 1929) Casavant.

Article

Caribbean Music in Canada

Caribbean music is an important component of musical life in Canada on two grounds: firstly, significant numbers of Caribbean peoples have immigrated to Canada, particularly beginning in the 1960s, and have continued the musical traditions of their homelands in the new environment; and secondly as early as the 1920s successive styles of Caribbean-derived music began to form part of the fabric of Euro-American pop music and thus part of the musical experience of many Canadians over the years.

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Women's Musical Club of Winnipeg

Women's Musical Club of Winnipeg. In 1990 the fifth-oldest existing club of its kind in Canada. It began informally in 1894 when six women - Mrs Gerald F. Brophy, Mrs L.A. Hamilton, Mrs H.A. Higginson, Mrs Angus Kirkland, Mrs F.H. Matthewson, and Mrs Fred Stobart - met weekly in one of their homes.

Article

Vive la Canadienne

'Vive la Canadienne'. National song most frequently sung in Quebec before 'O Canada' became popular. According to Ernest Gagnon (Chansons populaires du Canada, Quebec City 1865), this old French tune is a variant of 'Par derrièr' chez mon père.

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Youpe! Youpe! Sur la rivière!

'Youpe! Youpe! Sur la rivière!' Folksong adapted by Quebec lumberjacks from another song, 'Le P'tit Bois d'l'ail.' The words 'Youpe! Youpe! Sur la rivière,' which form the typically Canadian refrain, are not found in 'Le P'tit Bois d'l'ail,' since it has no refrain.

Article

Winnipeg Auditorium

Winnipeg Auditorium. Winnipeg's main concert hall complex from 1932, when it opened, until 1968, when it was supplanted in that function by the Manitoba Centennial Concert Hall. It was designed jointly by three architectural firms - Northwood & Chivers, Pratt & Ross, and J.N.