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Article

Wade MacLauchlan

H. Wade MacLauchlan, CM, OPEI, MLA, 32nd premier of Prince Edward Island (2015–19), president of University of Prince Edward Island (1999–2011), lawyer, academic (born 10 December 1954 in Stanhope, PEI). MacLauchlan was sworn in as premier of Prince Edward Island on 23 February 2015, becoming the province’s first openly gay premier. The former law professor and university president received the Order of Canada in 2008 and the Order of Prince Edward Island in 2014. He is the author of Alex B. Campbell: The Prince Edward Island Premier Who Rocked the Cradle (2014).

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Gordon Muir Campbell

His political career began in 1984 with his election to Vancouver City Council. Two years later, Campbell became mayor, an office he held until 1993. During that time, he also served as president of the Union of BC Municipalities and chaired the Greater Vancouver Regional District.

Article

John Buchanan

John MacLennan Buchanan, premier of Nova Scotia 1978–90, senator 1990–2006, lawyer (born 22 April 1931 in Sydney, NS; died 3 October 2019). A master political campaigner, Buchanan was the longest-serving Conservative premier in Nova Scotian history, and was among the leaders who negotiated the accord to repatriate Canada’s Constitution in 1982.

Article

Jack Layton

Son of Robert Layton, a former prominent Québec Liberal who later became a Conservative MP and cabinet minister, Jack Layton graduated in political science from McGill University with a BA (1970) and from York University with an MA (1971) and a PhD (1984). His PhD thesis dealt with globalization.

Article

John Oliver

(Edward) John (Clavering) Oliver. Composer, guitarist, conductor, b Vancouver 21 Sep 1959; B MUS (British Columbia) 1982, M MUS (McGill) 1984, DMA (McGill) 1992.

Article

Joey Smallwood

Joseph “Joey” Roberts Smallwood, CC, premier of Newfoundland (1949–72), journalist (born 24 December 1900 in Mint Brook, NL; died 17 December 1991 in St. John's, NL). The leading proponent of Confederation in Newfoundland in the 20th century, Joey Smallwood played an important role in bringing the province into Confederation in 1949. He served as Newfoundland and Labrador’s first premier for nearly 23 years, and is sometimes referred to as “the last Father of Confederation.” During his lifetime, he was also called “the only living Father of Confederation.”

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Allan Blakeney

Recruited by Tommy Douglas in 1950, the Rhodes scholar became one of the CCF government's most valuable civil servants, first as a legal adviser to the province's embattled crown corporations, then as a senior official in the Treasury Dept.

Macleans

Jack Layton (Tribute)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 12, 2011. Partner content is not updated.

About a month after he led the NDP to its election breakthrough last May 2, Jack Layton was still at a loss to explain what had really happened on the campaign trail.

Article

James Alexander Murray

James Alexander Murray, businessman, politician, premier of NB (b at Moncton, NB 9 Nov 1864; d at Sussex, NB 16 Feb 1960). A respected politician and forceful speaker, Murray represented Kings County 1908-20.

Article

Francis Nicholson

Francis Nicholson, soldier, governor of NS (b at Downholme, Eng 12 Nov 1655; d at London, Eng 5 Mar 1727/28). He led 2 unsuccessful attacks on Canada via the Hudson River and Lake CHAMPLAIN (1709 and 1711).

Article

Hiram Blanchard

Hiram Blanchard, lawyer, politician, premier of Nova Scotia (b at West River, NS 17 Jan 1820; d at Halifax 17 Dec 1874). Blanchard began his legal career at Port Hood, moving to Halifax only after election as Reform (Liberal) member for Inverness County in 1859.

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Jason Kenney

Jason Kenney, politician, leader of the United Conservative Party of Alberta, premier of Alberta (born 30 May 1968 in Oakville, ON). Jason Kenney is the leader of the United Conservative Party in Alberta and the Leader of the Opposition in that province. From 1997 to 2016, he was Member of Parliament for Calgary Southeast. He held several Cabinet positions in the Conservative government under Prime Minister Stephen Harper, including minister for citizenship, immigration and multiculturalism, minister of employment and social development and minister of national defence. Kenney resigned his seat in Parliament in 2016, following the defeat of the Conservative government in the previous year’s election. In 2017, he was elected leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservative party, which then merged with the Wildrose Party. After the merger, Kenney was elected leader of the United Conservative Party. On 16 April 2019, Kenney and the UCP won a majority government in the Alberta general election.

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Joe Clark

Charles Joseph “Joe” Clark, PC, CC, journalist, author, 16th prime minister of Canada 1979-80, (born 5 June, 1939 at High River, AB). Clark was Canada's youngest prime minister when he took office one day before his 40th birthday. His brief term put a temporary end to 16 years of Liberal rule. He later gained respect as a senior minister in the Progressive Conservative government of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, especially on the international stage.

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Christy Clark

Christina Joan “Christy” Clark, 35th premier of British Columbia (2011–2017), radio broadcaster, political staffer (born 29 October 1965 in Burnaby, BC). Clark was a fiscal conservative with a populist flourish, often compared to legendary premier W.A.C. Bennett. She was the first female premier to be re-elected in Canadian history.

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Henry Wise Wood

Henry Wise Wood, farmer, farm leader (b on a farm near Monroe City, Mo 31 May 1860; d at Calgary 10 June 1941). A member of a prosperous family with farms in Missouri and Texas, Wood became an expert stockman while a teenager.

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W.A.C. Bennett

William Andrew Cecil Bennett, PC, OC, premier of British Columbia 1952-72, merchant, politician, (born 6 September 1900 in Hastings, NB; died 23 February 1979 in Kelowna, BC). Bennett led his province during a period of unparalleled economic expansion and is the longest serving premier in BC history.

Article

Bill Davis

In 1962 Premier John Robarts gave the novice the political "hot potato" of the Department of Education, and as minister Davis presided over the most extraordinary period of change since Egerton Ryerson's day. Universities such as Trent and Brock were created.

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