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Indian Horse

Indian Horse (2012) is the sixth novel by Ojibwe author Richard Wagamese. Set in Northern Ontario in the late 1950s and early 1960s, it follows protagonist Saul Indian Horse as he uses his extraordinary talent for ice hockey to try and escape his traumatic residential school experience. He achieves moderate success as a hockey player but is unable to escape his “Indian” identity or the trauma from his past. Indian Horse was a finalist on CBC’s Canada Reads in 2013, where it won the People’s Choice award. It was also the winner of the 2013–14 First Nation Communities Read Selection and the Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Literature from the Canadian Organization for Development through Education (CODE). In 2017, Indian Horse was adapted into an award-winning film by writer Dennis Foon and director Stephen S. Campanelli.

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Ballet

Ballet is a stylized form of Western theatrical dance based on a codified system of movement. It can be used to tell a story, evoke a mood, illustrate a piece of music, or simply provide a presentation of theatrical movement that is entertaining or intriguing in itself.

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2 Pianos 4 Hands

2 Pianos 4 Hands. Two-person comedy-drama with music; semi-autobiographical show by the pianists-playwrights Ted Dykstra (b Chatham, Ont 1961) and Richard Greenblatt (b Montreal, 1952 or 1953).

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Windigo

A windigo is a supernatural being belonging to the spiritual traditions of Algonquian-speaking First Nations in North America. Windigos are described as powerful monsters that have a desire to kill and eat their victims. In most legends, humans transform into windigos because of their greed or weakness. Various Indigenous traditions consider windigos dangerous because of their thirst for blood and their ability to infect otherwise healthy people or communities with evil. Windigo legends are essentially cautionary tales about isolation and selfishness, and the importance of community.

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Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal

Founded in 1958 by Ludmilla Chiriaeff, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal is the most progressive and experimental of Canada’s three big ballet troupes (the National Ballet of Canada and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet being the other two). It is noted for a diverse repertoire that has emphasized new works as well as traditional 19th-century story-ballets and 20th-century classics. The company has also had a strong record of commissioning original works that are often choreographed, composed and designed by Canadians (see also Dance in Canada).

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Centaur Theatre Company

Centaur Theatre began with an annual budget of $120 000, leasing a 220-seat auditorium in the Old Stock Exchange building at 453 St. François-Xavier Street in Old Montréal. In 1974, the company purchased this historic building and spent $1.3 million in renovations designed by architect Victor PRUS.

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April Wine

A staple of Canadian classic rock, April Wine was one of the most popular and commercially successful Canadian rock bands of the 1970s and early 1980s.

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Bear (Novel)

Bear, by Marian Engel (Toronto, 1976), winner of the Governor-General's Award, has been called the most controversial novel ever written in Canada because of its heroine's erotic relationship with a bear.

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Apocalypsis

R. Murray Schafer’s Apocalypsis is a theatrical musical pageant in two parts — Part 1: John's Vision is adapted from the book of Revelation, about the end times, while Part 2: Credo is a serene and ecstatic meditation on the majesty of God. A massive and complex production that requires at least 500 performers, Apocalypsis was commissioned by the CBC in 1976 and premiered at Centennial Hall in London, Ontario, on 28 November 1980, as part of the city’s 125th anniversary. William Littler called it “one of the most spectacular events in the history of Canadian music.” In 2015, Toronto’s Luminato Festival closed with an acclaimed, $1.5 million production featuring a cast of nearly 1,000 musicians, singers, conductors, dancers and actors. The score to Part 1 and Part 2 are published separately and available through Schafer’s Arcana Editions (Part 1, 1981; Part 2, 1986).

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Air Canada Award

The Air Canada Award, presented at the annual Genie Awards from 1980 to 1994, was given for "outstanding contributions to the business of filmmaking in Canada."

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Brunswick String Quartet

Brunswick String Quartet. Quartet-in-residence until 1989 at the University of New Brunswick. It was formed in 1970 with the assistance of the Canada Council as the University of New Brunswick Pach String Quartet.

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Brébeuf

Brébeuf, B29. Healey Willan's setting, for two narrators, choir, and orchestra, of E.J. Pratt's poem 'Brébeuf and His Brethren' (Toronto 1940), which tells the story of the 17th-century missionary (1593-1649) among the Hurons.

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Zero Patience

Zero Patience (1993), director/writer/video artist John GREYSON's first theatrical release, is one of his most scathing and strangely hilarious indictments of systematic homophobia.

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World Music

World music is a direct and powerful indicator of the multicultural nature of Canadian society. Broadly interpreted, "world music" can mean the traditional musics of cultures outside North America and Western Europe, or contemporary versions of traditional musics.