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Article

Blackie and the Rodeo Kings

Blackie & The Rodeo Kings was initially conceived in 1996 as a tribute act to singer-songwriter Willie P. Bennett. By renewing interest in Bennett and other Canadian songwriters, Colin Linden, Stephen Fearing and Tom Wilson believed they would also gain a wider audience for their solo careers.

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ADISQ

Founded in Montréal in 1975 by Yvan Dufresne, André Perry, Gilles Talbot, Frank Furtado, Guy Latraverse, Daniel Lazare and Michel Constantino, the Association québécoise des producteurs de disques (AQPD) was first established in October 1977 as the Association du Disque, de l'Industrie du Spectacle Québecois (and video as of 1987) or ADISQ.

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Church Choir Schools

Church choir schools. Institutions set up to train young musicians in the literature and performance of church music and to enable them, through the presentation of such music, to worship in a manner at once spiritual and artistic.

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Heavy Metal

Heavy metal. Rock music subgenre and stylistic approach. Heavy metal evolved ca 1968-9 from such British psychedelic- and blues-rock bands as Cream, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath.

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Alliance française in Canada

Since 1902, the Alliance Française has offered high-level French classes in Canada and developed cultural programming to boost the cultural influence of France and the Francophonie throughout the world. While it once had twenty committees scattered across Canada, today there remain nine, located in large cities outside Quebec. Each year, the Alliance Française receives 12,000 students in Canada and close to half a million worldwide. Its funding comes mainly from enrolment income from the classes it offers. The Alliance Française de Toronto is the largest in the country, with five branches established in the region.

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Tommy Douglas and Eugenics

Tommy Douglas — the father of socialized medicine in Canada and one of the country’s most beloved figures — once supported eugenic policies. In 1933, he received a Master of Arts in sociology from McMaster University for his thesis, “The Problems of the Subnormal Family.” In the thesis, Douglas recommended several eugenic policies, including the sterilization of “mental defectives and those incurably diseased.” His ideas were not unique, as two Canadian provinces (and 32 American states) passed sexual-sterilization legislation in the 1920s and 1930s. However, by the time Douglas became premier of Saskatchewan in 1944, he had abandoned his support for eugenic policies. When Douglas received two reports that recommended legalizing sexual sterilization in the province, he rejected the idea.

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Turtle Island

For some Indigenous peoples, Turtle Island refers to the continent of North America. The name comes from various Indigenous oral histories that tell stories of a turtle that holds the world on its back. For some Indigenous peoples, the turtle is therefore considered an icon of life, and the story of Turtle Island consequently speaks to various spiritual and cultural beliefs.

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Siksikáí’powahsin: Blackfoot Language

Siksikáí’powahsin (commonly referred to as the Blackfoot language) is an Algonquian language spoken by four Blackfoot nations: the Siksiká (Blackfoot), Aapátohsipikani (North Piikani), Aamsskáápipikani (South Piikani) and Kainai (Blood). While there are some dialectal differences between these groups, speakers can generally understand one another. Blackfoot is an endangered language; since the 1960s, the number of new speakers has significantly decreased. The development of language programs and resources in Canada and the United States seek to preserve the language and promote it to new speakers.

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Community Broadcasting

Community Broadcasting is designed to fulfil social and cultural needs by allowing members of the audience to participate in decisions about programming and, in the case of radio, in the ownership of stations.

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Bar Salon

Bar Salon established writer/director André Forcier, who was only 25 years old at the time of filming, as a major talent in Québec cinema.

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Blues

African-American folk and pop music with a vocal and instrumental tradition; also a song form. Though by origin and nature a folk music, the blues enjoyed wider popularity with the advent of commercial recording.

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Les Plouffe

Roger LEMELIN's famous novel, LES PLOUFFE, had already been serialized for radio in 1952 before being made into the first, and hugely successful, téléroman (1953-59) for Québec television. The story of the Plouffe family became deeply woven into the fabric of Québec popular culture.

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Amici Chamber Ensemble

Amici's first concert was held at Toronto's Harbourfront in 1985. Three years later, the group initiated a successful three-concert season held at St. Andrew's Church. In 1989, it relocated to Walter Hall at the University of Toronto, and was appointed the music faculty's Trio-in-Residence.

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Calgary Stampede

Billed as the "Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth," the first exhibition took place in 1886 and the world-famous Stampede rodeo began in 1912, instigated by Guy Weadick, an American trick roper who had visited Calgary and judged the emerging town to be a prime location for a big rodeo.

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Art Illustration

 The earliest printed image relating to Canada is a bird's-eye view of Hochelaga and environs, published by Giovanni Ramusio in Venice in 1556.