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Church Silver

In the 17th century, religious silver was brought to the colonies by missionaries, or sent from patrons in France. The Huron of Lorette, Qué, have an important French reliquary presented to the mission in 1679 and a monstrance of 1664 that originally belonged to the Jesuits.

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Submersible

The Canadian government took delivery of a HYSUB 5000 ROV in 1987. Designed and manufactured by International Submarine Engineering (ISE) of Port Moody, BC, the HYSUB is an electrohydraulic submersible remotely operated vehicle, operating with 6 to 250 hp.

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Toronto Blue Jays

The Toronto Blue Jays are a professional baseball team based in Toronto, Ontario. The team has won six East Division titles, two AL pennants and two World Series titles.

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Thrips

Thrips, order Thysanoptera (Gk for "fringe-wings"), are among the smallest insects, being slender and usually less than 2 mm long.

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Acid Rain

Acid rain is the wet or dry deposition of acidic substances and their precursors on the Earth's surface. The ongoing industrialization of society has resulted in the increased release of acidic chemicals into the atmosphere.

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Tanager

The tanager (Thraupidae) is a family of small songbirds, possibly comprising as many as 413 species.

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Woven Textiles

Canada has a rich history of weaving stretching back to the precontact Indigenous peoples and enriched by each succeeding wave of immigrants.

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Sturgeon

The sturgeon is a large, primitive, bony fish of class Actinopterygii, family Acipenseridae. The 4 genera and 24 species live in fresh and coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere.

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Sunday Schools

Raikes's innovation, quickly copied in Britain, was brought to Canada mainly by the PRESBYTERIAN and CONGREGATIONAL churches.

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Tungsten

Tungsten (W), also called Wolfram, lapis ponderosus or Heavy Stone, is a silver-grey metallic element with the highest melting point of any metal (3410° C). Tungsten has a high density, high strength at elevated temperatures and extreme hardness.

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Time

Precise timekeeping helped establish and develop Canada. For the past 2 centuries, Canadian exploration, mapping, navigation and transportation have exploited state-of-the-art precise time systems.

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Tunnels

Unlike other mountainous countries such as Switzerland, and despite its size, Canada is not distinguished by well-known tunnels.

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Separate School

In both the US and Canada parents are free to choose to send their children to the state-run public SCHOOL SYSTEM or to a variety of private fee-paying schools.

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Shrimp

Shrimp are decapods ("10-footed") crustacean, differing from other decapods in being adapted for swimming, a fact reflected in the large, laterally compressed abdomen and well-developed pairs of swimming legs.

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Sidbec-Dosco (Ispat) Inc

Sidbec-Dosco (Ispat) Inc, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ispat International group, has its principal steel mill in CONTRECOEUR, and its head office in MONTRÉAL, Québec. Sidbec-Dosco is Canada's fourth largest steel producer.

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Canada and the Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was fought during the First World War from 1 July to 18 November 1916. In the summer of 1916 the British launched the largest battle of the war on the Western Front, against German lines. The offensive was one of the bloodiest in human history. Over the course of five months, approximately 1.2 million men were killed or wounded at the Somme. The Canadian Corps (see Canadian Expeditionary Force) was involved in the final three months of fighting. On the first day of the offensive, the First Newfoundland Regiment, which was not part of the Canadian forces, was nearly annihilated at Beaumont-Hamel. The Battle of the Somme produced little gains and has long been an example of senseless slaughter and the futility of trench warfare (see also The Somme).

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Shopping Centre

A shopping centre is a group of retail and service establishments built and managed as a unit, having one or more major "anchor" tenants and its own large parking area. Two American prototypes were Market Square, Lake Forest, Ill (1916), and Country Club Plaza, Kansas City, Mo (1922).