Search for ""

Displaying 2221-2240 of 5847 results
Article

Social Security

Social security refers to government programs that replace people's income lost due to pregnancy, illness, accident, disability, the death or absence of a family's breadwinner, unemployment, old age or retirement.

Article

South Sea Company

South Sea Company, chartered in 1711 by the British Parliament, with a monopoly over the W coast of the Americas to a distance of 300 leagues out to sea. In 1720 it assumed a large part of the British national debt and almost collapsed that year in a stock market crash known as the South Sea Bubble.

Article

Slug

Slug is a common name for several terrestrial pulmonate and numerous marine gilled species of gastropod molluscs conspicuous by the lack of an exposed shell.

Article

Classics

Elsewhere in Canada, particularly after Confederation, Latin and Greek, tenacious factors in secondary-school class offerings until WWII, were taught along Victorian and Edwardian disciplinarian lines favoured in English and Scottish universities and schools.

Article

Social History

Social history is a way of looking at how a society organizes itself and how this changes over time. The elements that make up Canada’s social history include climate and geography, as well as the transition to industrialization and urbanization.

Article

Socialist Party of Canada

Socialist Party of Canada (SPC) emerged in 1904 when the Socialist Party of British Columbia, a group of Marxists influential in BC mining camps and among BC trade unionists, merged with the Canadian Socialist League. By 1910 it had spread from coast to coast.

Article

Whale

 Whale, common name for large, aquatic or marine mammals of order Cetacea, which inhabit all oceans.

Article

Silver Dart

J.A.D. MCCURDY was the principal designer and pilot; Glenn H. Curtiss developed the water-cooled engine, an advance on the association's earlier experiments.

Article

Canada at the Paralympic Games

The Paralympic Games are an international competition for elite athletes with a disability. The name comes from "para," as in "parallel" or "equal." Like the Olympics, the Paralympic Games take place every two years, alternating between summer and winter sports. The country hosting the Olympic Games also hosts the Paralympics. Canada has participated in the Paralympic Games since 1968.

Article

Sisters of Providence

A female religious congregation founded in 1844 in Montréal by the widow Marie-Émilie Gamelin, née Tavernier, under the name of Daughters of Charity, Servants of the Poor (the present name has been in official usage since 1970).

Article

Sisters of St Anne

Sisters of St Anne, a female religious congregation founded in 1850 in Vaudreuil, Qué, by the Servant of God Marie-Esther Sureau, dit Blondin (Mother Marie-Anne), for the education of young rural girls and some activities of mercy.

Article

Church Silver

In the 17th century, religious silver was brought to the colonies by missionaries, or sent from patrons in France. The Huron of Lorette, Qué, have an important French reliquary presented to the mission in 1679 and a monstrance of 1664 that originally belonged to the Jesuits.

Article

Submersible

The Canadian government took delivery of a HYSUB 5000 ROV in 1987. Designed and manufactured by International Submarine Engineering (ISE) of Port Moody, BC, the HYSUB is an electrohydraulic submersible remotely operated vehicle, operating with 6 to 250 hp.

Article

Toronto Blue Jays

The Toronto Blue Jays are a professional baseball team based in Toronto, Ontario. The team has won six East Division titles, two AL pennants and two World Series titles.

Article

Thrips

Thrips, order Thysanoptera (Gk for "fringe-wings"), are among the smallest insects, being slender and usually less than 2 mm long.

Article

Acid Rain

Acid rain is the wet or dry deposition of acidic substances and their precursors on the Earth's surface. The ongoing industrialization of society has resulted in the increased release of acidic chemicals into the atmosphere.

Article

Tanager

The tanager (Thraupidae) is a family of small songbirds, possibly comprising as many as 413 species.