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Telephones

The invention of the TELEGRAPH (1837) by Samuel Morse and the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham BELL were milestones in the quest to communicate over great distances with reliability, accuracy and speed.

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Team Handball

Team handball is also known as European or Olympic handball. The object is to score goals by passing and throwing a ball (slightly smaller than a soccer ball) into the opponents' goal. It is played indoors on a court similar in size to that for basketball, with teams of 7 players.

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Toboggan

Historically among subarctic Aboriginal groups, the toboggan was a common means of hauling small loads or people over snow. Typically, toboggans were constructed of two or more thin boards of larch or birch wood, secured to one

Macleans

Cirque du Soleil

Las Vegas is the last place you would expect to find art. The city rises from the Nevada desert like a pop-up cartoon of American consumerism.

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Synchronized Swimming

The governing body of synchronized swimming in Canada is Synchro Canada. The basic skills of synchronized swimming are strokes and figures, which were originally part of the Royal Life Saving Society program.

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Sumac

Sumac is a shrub of the genus Rhus of the family Anacardiaceae.

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Swift

Swift is a common name for about 100 species of birds in 2 closely related families (Apodidae, Hemiprocnidae).

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Strikes and Lockouts

A strike is the withholding of labour by workers in order to obtain better wages or working conditions. A lockout is the opposite, being the temporary shutdown of a business by an employer to compel employees to accept certain conditions.

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Tennis

Modern tennis almost certainly originated in France in the 11th century as a form of handball called le jeu de paume. The game, also called "court tennis" or "real tennis," was played on an indoor court - originally in a monastery - with a ball, and by 1500 a racquet was introduced.

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Thistle

The thistle (Carduaceae tribe, family Compositae or Asteraceae) is a spiny herbaceous plant with white or purple flowers. There are 800 species worldwide, 46 in Canada (15 native). Native species (none serious WEEDS) are mainly "true" or "plumed" thistles of genus Cirsium.

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Toad

Toad is a common name for certain members of the amphibian order Anura, the frogs.

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W.D. Lawrence

W.D. Lawrence, 2548 ton square-rigged sailing ship built in 1874 in Maitland, NS. It was designed and built by William Dawson Lawrence, who earned substantial profits from the ship until 1883, when he sold it to a Norwegian.

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Université du Québec Network

The Université du Québec (UQ) was founded on 18 December 1968 and is the only public university network in Canada. It includes 10 institutions (six universities, one research institute and three higher-education establishments) throughout Québec. UQ is headquartered in Québec City.

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Western University

Ontario's third largest university, Western University was founded in 1878 as the Western University of London, a denominational school of the Church of England.

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Trust Company

A trust company is the only legal entity that can act as a trustee by holding property in TRUST for such functions as executors, trustees and administrators of estates, personal trusts, PENSION plans and MUTUAL FUNDS.

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Trent Affair

Trent Affair, the most serious diplomatic crisis between Britain and the US federal government during the AMERICAN CIVIL WAR.