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Celtic Languages

The Celtic languages belong to the family of languages known as Indo-European and as such are related to most of the languages of Europe and many others found as far east of Europe as India. Linguists recognize 2 main divisions of Celtic: Continental Celtic and Insular Celtic.

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Char

Char is the common name for several species of fish of genus Salvelinus of the salmon family (Salmonidae). Approximately 11 char species occur worldwide. Five are native to Canada: arctic char (S. alpinus), Dolly Varden (S. malma), bull trout (S. confluentus), brook trout (S. fontinalis) and lake trout (S. namaycush).

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Canadian Business

Canadian Business, a magazine established in 1927, is Canada's leading business monthly magazine. It was owned by the Montréal Chamber of Commerce and published in Montréal from its inception until 1978, when it was bought by Michael de Pencier, Alexander Ross and Roy MacLaren, and moved to Toronto.

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Château Clique

 Château Clique, nickname given to the small group of officials, usually members of the anglophone merchant community, including John MOLSON and James MCGILL, who dominated the executive and legislative councils, the judiciary and senior bureaucratic positions of LOWER CANADA until the 1830s.

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Capote

Capote, a hooded greatcoat rather like a parka, usually worn with a sash around the waist, popular with habitants of New France and French Canadian traders and trappers. The word is derived from the French word for "cape.

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Credit Card

A credit card is a card authorizing the holder to make purchases on credit. Credit cards are issued by financial institutions and non-financial businesses (eg, department stores, gasoline companies).

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Crustacean

Crustacean, shelled invertebrate with segmented body and limbs at some stage of its life, an exoskeleton and 2 pairs of antennae. The exoskeleton, a protective and supportive framework located outside the body, is periodically molted to allow for growth.

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Canol Pipeline

Canol Pipeline, a 10 cm oil pipeline built from 1942 to 1944 from Norman Wells, NWT, 1000 km to a refinery at Whitehorse, Yukon.

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Shanty

A shanty is a winter lumber camp. The term is derived from the French Canadian word for lumber camp, "chantier."

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Canadian Dollar (CAD)

The Canadian dollar, also known as the loonie, for the loon on the $1 coin, is the currency of Canada. Its international currency code is CAD and its symbol $, or C$, to distinguish it from other dollar currencies. As money, it is the measure of value in which all prices in Canada are expressed and the medium of exchange for goods and services. It is divided into 100 cents (¢) and available in material form as coins circulated by the Royal Canadian Mint and banknotes circulated by the Bank of Canada.

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Cape Scott Provincial Park

Cape Scott Provincial Park (established 1973, 50 km2), on the northwest tip of VANCOUVER I, BC, includes 64 km of coast with 23 km of sandy beaches interspersed by rocky headlands. The land rises inland to Mount St Patrick (415 m), and in it lies a 44 ha body of freshwater, Eric Lake.

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Christianity

​Christianity is a major world religion, and the religion of some 80 per cent of Canadians. Believers hold that the life, death and resurrection of Jesus in the first century AD, as presented in the Bible and in the Christian tradition, are central to their understanding of who they are and how they should live.