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Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea, Gongylodes Group), sometimes called stem turnip or cabbage turnip, an important Canadian garden vegetable of the Cruciferae family.

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Biogeography

Ecology is subdivided into 3 fields of study: autecology (relations of individual species or populations to their milieu), synecology (composition of living communities) and dynecology (processes of change in related communities).

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Climate

Climate is often defined as average weather, when weather means the current state of the atmosphere. For scientists, climates are the result of exchanges of heat and moisture at the Earth's surface. Because of its size, Canada has many different climates.

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McKee Trophy

 McKee Trophy, award given annually for contribution to the advancement of Canadian aviation. It was donated by J. Dalzell McKee, an American sportsman pilot, who completed the first flight of a seaplane across Canada in 1926.

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Historiography in French

Various descriptive works and narratives dealing with Canada and published in France during the 17th and 18th centuries were entitled "histoires." Although written by Frenchmen who in many cases had only visited New France, these publications profoundly influenced French Canadian historiography.

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Ash

Ash (Fraxinus), genus of trees or shrubs of olive family (Oleaceae). About 60 species occur worldwide, primarily in cold temperate regions; 4 are native to Canada.

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Marmot

The marmot is a large, diurnal, burrowing rodent of the squirrel family, native to Eurasia and North America.

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Melon

The melon (Cucumis melo), is an annual, viny plant of the Cucurbitaceae family. The most important cultivated groups are cantaloupe, muskmelon, winter melon and sugar melon.

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Medical Jurisprudence

Medical jurisprudence, broadly defined, covers the relationship between a patient and a health-care provider such as a doctor, nurse, dentist, physiotherapist, or even an institution such as a HOSPITAL.

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Metropolitan-Hinterland Thesis

The Metropolitan-Hinterland Thesis is a theory of historic relations between a large, powerful urban community (metropolis) and the surrounding territory (hinterland) which the metropolis dominates through mainly economic means. Formulated by economic historian N.S.B.

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Michif

Michif is a language spoken by Métis peoples mostly in parts of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Montana. Michif is mainly a combination of Cree and French, but the language also borrows from English and other Indigenous languages, including Ojibwe. Michif is considered an endangered language. In 2016 Statistics Canada reported that 1,170 people identified as Michif speakers. While Michif is the most commonly spoken Métis language, it is not the only one; others include: French Cree, French Michif, Bungi and Brayet.

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Malaria

Early settlers in Ontario experienced a disease called "fever and ague," which ravaged the first European settlements such as Newark [Niagara-on-the-Lake] and Cataraqui [Kingston].

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Medicine Wheels

The term medicine wheel is not an Aboriginal term, but was initially used around the turn of the century by Americans of European ancestry in reference to the Bighorn Medicine Wheel located near Sheridan, Wyoming. Later archaeological research on the Plains Aboriginal people identified other features characterized by a variety of stone circle, cairn and spoke configurations. Because of general similarities to the Bighorn Wheel, the term medicine wheel was extended to describe them as well.

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Limestone

Slaked lime is quicklime combined with water; this hydrated lime is then sized to meet customer specifications.

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French-speaking Louisiana and Canada

Located in the southern United States, the state of Louisiana has a population of 4,533,372 according to the 2010 census. Louisiana’s history is closely tied to Canada’s. In the 17th century, Louisiana was colonized by French Canadians in the name of the King of France. In the years that followed, additional waves of settlers came from French Canada to Louisiana, notably the Acadians, after their deportation by British troops in 1755. Today, Louisiana maintains a special cultural relationship with Canada and Quebec in particular.