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Ash

Ash (Fraxinus), genus of trees or shrubs of olive family (Oleaceae). About 60 species occur worldwide, primarily in cold temperate regions; 4 are native to Canada.

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Marmot

The marmot is a large, diurnal, burrowing rodent of the squirrel family, native to Eurasia and North America.

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Melon

The melon (Cucumis melo), is an annual, viny plant of the Cucurbitaceae family. The most important cultivated groups are cantaloupe, muskmelon, winter melon and sugar melon.

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Medical Jurisprudence

Medical jurisprudence, broadly defined, covers the relationship between a patient and a health-care provider such as a doctor, nurse, dentist, physiotherapist, or even an institution such as a HOSPITAL.

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Metropolitan-Hinterland Thesis

The Metropolitan-Hinterland Thesis is a theory of historic relations between a large, powerful urban community (metropolis) and the surrounding territory (hinterland) which the metropolis dominates through mainly economic means. Formulated by economic historian N.S.B.

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Michif

Michif is a language spoken by Métis peoples mostly in parts of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Montana. Michif is mainly a combination of Cree and French, but the language also borrows from English and other Indigenous languages, including Ojibwe. Michif is considered an endangered language. In 2016 Statistics Canada reported that 1,170 people identified as Michif speakers. While Michif is the most commonly spoken Métis language, it is not the only one; others include: French Cree, French Michif, Bungi and Brayet.

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Malaria

Early settlers in Ontario experienced a disease called "fever and ague," which ravaged the first European settlements such as Newark [Niagara-on-the-Lake] and Cataraqui [Kingston].

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Medicine Wheels

The term medicine wheel is not an Aboriginal term, but was initially used around the turn of the century by Americans of European ancestry in reference to the Bighorn Medicine Wheel located near Sheridan, Wyoming. Later archaeological research on the Plains Aboriginal people identified other features characterized by a variety of stone circle, cairn and spoke configurations. Because of general similarities to the Bighorn Wheel, the term medicine wheel was extended to describe them as well.

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Limestone

Slaked lime is quicklime combined with water; this hydrated lime is then sized to meet customer specifications.

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French-speaking Louisiana and Canada

Located in the southern United States, the state of Louisiana has a population of 4,533,372 according to the 2010 census. Louisiana’s history is closely tied to Canada’s. In the 17th century, Louisiana was colonized by French Canadians in the name of the King of France. In the years that followed, additional waves of settlers came from French Canada to Louisiana, notably the Acadians, after their deportation by British troops in 1755. Today, Louisiana maintains a special cultural relationship with Canada and Quebec in particular.

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Massey-Ferguson Limited

From its earliest days the company acquired the rights to innovative machinery, making agricultural history with the Toronto Light Binder during the late 19th century and in 1927 acquiring the Wallis Tractor.

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MacMillan Bloedel Limited

MacMillan Bloedel Limited, with head offices in Vancouver, is Canada's largest forest-products company. It began in 1909 as the Powell River Paper Company Ltd, and it was reorganized as the Powell River Co in 1911.

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McLean Gang

McLean Gang, BC outlaws (fl 1879). Consisting of Allan, Charlie and Archie McLean and Alex Hare (all 4 of mixed blood), the gang lived by banditry and violence.

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Mary Celeste

Mary Celeste was a brigantine built in 1861 at Spencer's Island, Nova Scotia, and originally named Amazon. She was wrecked off Cape Breton in 1867, salvaged, sold and in 1868 registered at New York and renamed Mary Celeste. In 1872 she was found adrift off the Azores, with no sign of her crew.

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Manitou

An Algonquian word meaning "mysterious being," or simply "mystery," that represents the unknown power of life and the universe.

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Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy is a legal process, governed by the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, that provides financial relief for debtors and a protection for creditors.

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Maple Trees in Canada

Maples are trees and shrubs in the genus Acer, previously classified within the maple family Aceraceae, but now placed by some taxonomists in Sapindaceae (Soapberry family), which also includes horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastaneum). There are approximately 150 species of maple around the world, most in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere, and the majority native to eastern Asia. Ten maple species are native to Canada, perhaps the best known being sugar maple (Acer saccharum) of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. The Canadian flag displays a stylized maple leaf, and maple is Canada’s official arboreal emblem. Maples are not only important to Canada symbolically, they are also ecologically and economically significant.