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The Acadian Flag

The Acadian flag, also called the flag of Acadia or the starred tricolour, consists of three vertical stripes of blue, white and red, with the star of the Virgin Mary in the blue stripe. In 1884, during the second National Convention of the Acadians in Miscouche, Prince Edward Island, the flag was chosen as one of the Acadian symbols. Today, the star and the colours of the flag can be found in the logos of a number of associations and groups linked to Acadians or their language. 

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Halifax Summit

It is a source of pride to Prime Minister Jean Chrétien that more than 30 years after he first entered politics, time has not altered his fondness for blunt talk - even in the most exclusive gatherings.

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Tidal Energy

Tidal energy is a largely untapped, renewable energy source based largely on lunar gravitation. While the potential of tidal hydroelectricity has long been recognized, compared to river dams, tidal power projects are expensive because massive structures must be built in difficult saltwater environments.

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Christianity

​Christianity is a major world religion, and the religion of some 80 per cent of Canadians. Believers hold that the life, death and resurrection of Jesus in the first century AD, as presented in the Bible and in the Christian tradition, are central to their understanding of who they are and how they should live.

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Carbone 14

Carbone 14, a theatre company based in Montréal until its quiet dissolution in 2005, produced a style of physical theatre that was formalistic, imagistic and avant-garde. From the beginning it excited audiences and influenced performance art in Québec.

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Canadian Army

​The history of the Canadian Army parallels that of Canada itself. What started as a small Confederation-era militia was built into a respected force of mostly citizen soldiers for the First and Second World Wars.

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Wind Energy

Wind energy is energy obtained from moving air. The motion results from the heating and cooling of the Earth; thus, wind energy is an indirect form of solar energy.

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British Commonwealth Air Training Plan

In 1939, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand and Australia signed an agreement creating the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP). Located in Canada, the plan's mandate was to train Allied aircrews for the Second World War, including pilots, navigators, bomb aimers, wireless operators, air gunners, and flight engineers. More than 130,000 crewmen and women were trained between 1939 and 1945, making this one of Canada's great contributions to Allied victory in the war. It led United States President Franklin Roosevelt to call Canada the "aerodrome of democracy."

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Metropolitan Opera

Metropolitan Opera. This illustrious and venerable (founded 1883) New York company has influenced the development of opera in Canada through its tours, broadcasts, and talent-development programs.

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The War of 1812 (Plain-Language Summary)

The War of 1812 was fought between Britain and the United States between 1812 and 1814. The war ended in a stalemate but had many lasting effects in Canada. It guaranteed Canada’s independence from the United States. It also gave Canadians their first experience working together as a community and helped develop a sense of nationhood.

(This article is a plain-language summary of the War of 1812. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry War of 1812.)

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Hummingbird

Hummingbird is a common name for New World family Trochilidae, which numbers more than 300 species.

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Le déclin de l'empire américain (The Decline of the American Empire)

A comedy of manners that functions as a sharp socio-political satire, Denys Arcand’s Le déclin de l'empire américain (1986) is widely considered one of the best Canadian films ever made. It won eight Genie Awards — including best picture, director and screenplay — and several international honours, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. It was named one of the Top 10 Canadian films of all time in two polls conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and the 10th-best Canadian film of all time in a 2002 Playback readers’ poll. It was followed by a sequel, the Academy Award-winning Les Invasions barbares, in 2003. In 2016, it was named one of 150 essential works in Canadian cinema history in a poll conducted by TIFF.

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Coins and Tokens

Coins are issued by governments for use as money. A quantity of coins issued at one time, or a series of coins issued under one authority, is called a coinage. Tokens are issued as a substitute for coinage, usually by private individuals or organizations such as merchants and banks. Canada’s complex political history has meant that Canadian numismatists have an astonishing variety of coins, coinages and tokens to collect and study.

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Christmas in Canada

Christmas is celebrated in various ways in contemporary Canada. In particular, it draws form the French, British and American traditions. Since the beginning of the 20th century, it had become the biggest annual celebration and had begun to take on the form that we recognize today.

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GST Harmonized in Atlantic

Frank McKenna had a big smile on his face, and a new spin on a familiar sales pitch. In a national newspaper advertisement that appeared late last week, the New Brunswick premier told readers across the country that "the best place in Canada to do business keeps getting better and better.