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Article

George Henry Dancer (Primary Source)

"So that meant there was eight of us and this was a three man dinghy. So we all got out there on the wing with the good float on it, to keep that other wing from getting down in the water."

See below for Mr. Dancer's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Sidney Albert Appleyard (Primary Source)

"Some of us in headquarters went into and checked the weights of these German soldiers when they were captured. There was none that lost any weight."

See below for Mr. Appleyard's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Jim Guy (Primary Source)

"Their tents had to be all [up] and they threw down their own tents. An officer or a man didn’t make any difference there. If help was required, you gave it."

See below for Mr. Guy's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War

In 1939, Canada found itself at war for the second time in a generation. As in the First World War (1914-18), thousands of Indigenous soldiers and nurses volunteered for the war effort at home and abroad, serving with distinction in the Canadian army, navy, and air force. At least 4,250 First Nations soldiers enlisted in the Canadian military in the Second World War, with thousands more Métis, Inuit, and non-Status Indian soldiers serving without official recognition of their Indigenous identity.

Article

Indigenous Peoples and the First World War

Indigenous soldiers, nurses, and ordinary civilians made a major contribution to Canada’s First World War effort. More than 4,000 First Nations soldiers fought for Canada during the war, officially recorded by the Department of Indian Affairs (see Federal Departments of Indigenous and Northern Affairs). In addition, thousands more non-Status Indians, Inuit, and Métis soldiers enlisted without official recognition of their Indigenous identity. More than 50 Indigenous soldiers were decorated for bravery in action, including the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) soldier Francis Pegahmagabow, Inuit soldier John Shiwak, and Cree soldier Henry Norwest.

Article

Ely Edmond Boeykens (Primary Source)

"The first thing we do most of the time is , “See that steeple on the church? Shoot it down.” Catholic church steeple, had to shoot the steeples down, because the Germans used to stand up there to look at you."

See below for Mr. Boeykens' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

James Duncan “Jim” Ritchie (Primary Source)

"We never had any problem with them. We’d go to their barber shops and get our hair cut. We were invited to their homes for meals."

See below for Mr. Ritchie's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Fred William Cash (Primary Source)

"So we couldn’t do anything about it other than watch them go into the sea. And that was a horrible, horrible, horrible experience for all of us."

See below for Mr. Cash's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Jack Western (Primary Source)

"The plane itself went down in what we call a flat corkscrew. Circling round and round and round and round and round...from about 12,000 feet"

See below for Mr. Western's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Ian Syme (Primary Source)

"People, unless they're very stupid or very unintelligent, do feel fear. You live with fear."

See below for Mr. Syme's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

David Abells (Primary Source)

"When I think of my grandchildren at 18 years old, I would, heck, definitely not like to think that they would have to see this type of thing."

See below for Mr. Abells' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Verna Ritchie (Primary Source)

"Early '44, the call came for three Red Cross girls to go to St. Dunstan's, which was the rehabilitation centre for war blind in England, and I was one of the three."

See below for Ms. Ritchie's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Malcolm MacConnell (Primary Source)

"I thought we were really done for but I was able to get back up into the clouds and I abandoned my attack. But that was a very very close one."

See below for Mr. MacConnell's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Robert Yule (Primary Source)

"We started, at first, we were not allowed to associate with the German folks but after a bit, they lifted the fraternization bar and we would have dance parties"

See below for Mr. Yule's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Milton Shefman (Primary Source)

"I was only about nineteen or so and, you know, when you're young, death is so distant to you."

See below for Mr. Shefman's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Leon Katz (Primary Source)

"By the time I arrived in Bad Oeynhausen these laws were already in place or being put in place and I was assigned to implement and control and manage several of these laws."

See below for Mr. Katz's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Alexander “Mack” Esdon (Primary Source)

"I was sent out to just check on lines. And this covering of artillery shells of all sizes going over, made for a very eerie and disquieting, but comforting, sound"

See below for Mr. Esdon's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Murray Heselton (Primary Source)

"It was quite traumatic, to change from being up in the air force flying every day to getting up in the morning, and from seeing everybody in a blue uniform, and all of a sudden, you’re into a civilian dress."

See below for Mr. Heselton's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Patrick Reidy (Primary Source)

"I participated in some of the now-famous battles – the Battle of Normandy, the Falaise Gap, the Scheldt, the Battle of the Rhineland and the crossing of the Rhine River…"

See below for Mr. Reidy's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Grace Breau-Theriault (Primary Source)

"We were a casualty clearing station on D Day. So we had boys back from the battlefield the same day."

See below for Ms. Breau-Theriault's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.