Search for "New France"

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Collège classique

Unique to French-speaking Canada, the collège classique (classical college) has over the centuries prepared Québec's social and intellectual elite for higher education. The first classical college was COLLÈGE DES JÉSUITES, established in New France by Jesuit missionaries in 1635.

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Collège des Jésuites

An estimated 1700 students attended the Collège des Jésuites, more than half of them being students from the Petit Séminaire. These pupils were drawn much more from the Québec than from the Montréal region. Louis JOLLIET is one of the most famous alumni of the college.

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School Facilities

The Indigenous peoples who occupied what is now called Canada for millennia had well-developed formal and informal systems for educating community members.

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École normale de musique

École normale de musique. Conservatory and teacher-training institution founded in 1926. It formed part of the Institut pédagogique of Westmount (Montreal), run by the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame.

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York University

York expanded rapidly in the 1960s, establishing new faculties and programs such as Atkinson College for part-time degree studies, the Centre for Research in Experimental Space Science, the Institute of Social Research and the Faculty of Administrative Studies.

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University Campuses

The word "campus" has acquired considerable reach and resonance. It now can be applied to almost any group of buildings with a common purpose on a landscaped site. There are office campuses, health campuses, industrial campuses and research campuses.

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Ontario Science Centre

The Ontario Science Centre is located in the Don Valley, Toronto. It was opened (1969) as one of Ontario's projects for the Canadian Centennial, funded both provincially and with a federal grant.

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Bible Schools

Bible colleges, institutes and seminaries are mainly sponsored by the Evangelical Protestant churches in Canada, although there are several Roman Catholic institutions in Canada. One of the first lay colleges in North America was established by T. Dewitt Talmage in 1872, in a church in Brooklyn, New York.

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Lakehead University

Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ont, was founded in 1965. Its roots date back to 1946 when Lakehead Technical Institute was established. The name was changed to Lakehead College of Arts, Science and Technology in 1956, and in 1957 the city of Port Arthur donated the land for a new college campus.

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University of Waterloo

The University of Waterloo is a public research university whose main campus is located in Waterloo, Ontario. Founded in 1957, the institution received its Ontario charter in 1959. It began as a nondenominational engineering and science faculty associated with the University of Western Ontario.

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University of Alberta

The Department of Extension (1912) quickly began offering lectures and library services across the province. The department later created two enduring Alberta institutions, CKUA radio (1927) and the Banff School of Fine Arts (1933, now the Banff Centre).

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Emily Carr University of Art and Design

Emily Carr University of Art and Design is the only post-secondary institution in British Columbia offering a program of study that is focused exclusively on arts, media and design. Based in a custom-built campus in Vancouver that opened in 2017, Emily Carr University has been at the forefront of exploring the use of digital technologies in art and design in the 21st century.

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Community College

The community college is a public post-secondary educational institution that offers a variety of programs to high-school graduates and adults seeking further education or employment training.

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Sunday Schools

Raikes's innovation, quickly copied in Britain, was brought to Canada mainly by the PRESBYTERIAN and CONGREGATIONAL churches.