Search for "New France"

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Western University

Ontario's third largest university, Western University was founded in 1878 as the Western University of London, a denominational school of the Church of England.

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Dalhousie University

Its auspicious beginnings were soon marred by governmental indifference and sectarian rivalry. Both the colonial establishment and the college's board of governors were unenthusiastic, favouring instead the precedence of King's College.

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Laurentian University

Laurentian University, in Greater Sudbury, Ont, was founded in 1960; instruction is in both French and English. Laurentian University dates from 1913 when the Roman Catholic Collège du Sacré-Coeur was established in Sudbury. In 1957 it became the University of Sudbury.

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University College

A public post-secondary educational institution, the university college was a hybrid institution in Canada. As its name implies, the university college incorporated many of the traditional values and culture of both the university and the community college.

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Acadia University

Acadia University is located in Wolfville, NS. In 1828, the Baptist Education Society of Nova Scotia founded Horton Academy in Horton [Wolfville], NS. Ten years later in 1838, the Baptists established Queen's College, sharing the Horton facilities.

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Ryerson University

 Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont, was founded 16 September 1948 as the Ryerson Institute of Technology. The institute is situated on historic St James Square, where the Toronto Normal School was established in 1852 by Egerton Ryerson, chief superintendent of education for Canada West.

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University of Saskatchewan

The University of Saskatchewan was founded in 1907. In 1879 the Church of England (see Anglicanism) established Emmanuel College in Prince Albert to train in theology, classics and Indigenous languages. In 1883 it became known as the University of Saskatchewan.

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Private School

Fee-supported educational institutions at the primary and secondary level not under direct government control have existed in Canada from the earliest years of white settlement to the present day. Until the 1830s, most schooling was private.

Macleans

University Rankings 1996: Winners

When Karrie Wolfe arrived at the UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO from her home in Kitchener, Ont., in September, she brought more than just top marks, a prestigious National Scholarship and her winter clothes. "Like a lot of people, I arrived with preconceptions about the U of T," says Wolfe.

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Brock University

In the late 1950s, there was growing public support for the establishment of a university in the Niagara region, so that young people could obtain a good education locally.

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Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) in Quebec

In Quebec, a Collège d’enseignement general et professionnel (General and professional teaching college in English) is a public school that provides students with the first level of post-secondary education. These institutions are most often referred to by the French acronym CEGEP. Quebec's first CEGEPs opened their doors in 1967, a few months after the adoption of the General and Vocational Colleges Act or Loi des collèges d'enseignement général et professionnel. In 2020, there were 48 CEGEPs in Quebec (see also Education in Canada, Community CollegeUniversities in Canada and University College).

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Algoma University College

Algoma University College, Sault Ste Marie, Ont, was established in 1967 as an affiliate of Laurentian University. The campus is constructed around a fine old building that originally housed the Shingwauk Indian Residential School.

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Bishop Strachan School

The Bishop Strachan School is an all-girls independent school in Toronto. It was founded in 1867, and today remains committed to its original mission of preparing young women to be leaders.