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Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Canada’s oldest and one of its most important arts institutions, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal) has been guided by a commitment to attract people from all walks of life. Established in 1847, originally under the name of Montreal Society of Artists, it became the Art Association of Montreal in 1860. In 1948-49, the association formed a new corporation under its present name. In 1972, it became a semipublic institution, largely funded by grants from different government levels.

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Royal Alexandra Theatre

The 'Royal Alex,' as it is known affectionately, was designed by John Lyle who, using New York's New Amsterdam Theater as a model, incorporated novel features such as air conditioning which required tons of ice and.9 m-thick concrete floors which made it Canada's first fireproof theatre.

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Religious Building

Later in the 17th century, under Jesuit influence and with the arrival of more artisans and builders trained in France, certain traditional features of religious architecture were used to construct churches in Québec City and Montréal.

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Stephansson House

Stephán G. STEPHANSSON left Iceland in 1873, settling first in the US before moving to Markerville in 1889. While in Markerville his political and philosophical thinking evolved, and he wrote extensively in Icelandic.

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Royal Alexandra Theatre

 The Royal Alexandra Theatre, Toronto, completed in 1907 at a cost of $750 000, is one of the few surviving large professional theatres found in numerous Canadian cities at the turn of the century. It was designed by John LYLE in 1906 for a group of prominent businessmen headed by Cawthra Mulock.

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St Mary's Church

The interior explains the unfamiliar shape; the entrance wall spirals inward past a circular baptistery to shield a broad, shadowed sanctuary under the downward billowing concrete vault. Two concrete cylinders descend from the vault to shed natural light on the altar and tabernacle areas.

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St. Lawrence Hall

St. Lawrence Hall opened in 1850 and was Toronto’s first large meeting hall. Named for Canada's patron saint, it was for many years the centre of cultural and political life in Toronto, hosting many balls, receptions, concerts, exhibitions and lectures.

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Theatre Royal

When in the early 1800s Montréal failed to attract talented artists for lack of a decent hall, John MOLSON built the 1500-seat Theatre Royal on a vacant lot owned by him on the corner of St Paul and Victor streets.

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Canadian Broadcasting Centre

The Canadian Broadcasting Centre was developed as the result of a proposal call process in which the Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited was selected to develop the 9.3 acre site, owned by the CBC, and build the centre, which was then leased to the CBC on a long-term basis.

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The Marine Building

The Marine Building has dominated its location in Vancouver's business core since it opened. The tower of the 21-storey building rises above a 4-storey podium with a narrow setback on the Hastings Street side and a 10-storey wing along Burrard Street.

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Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal

Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal is located at the intersection of Notre-Dame Street West and Saint-Sulpice Street in the borough of Ville-Marie in Montréal. This jewel of Québec’s religious heritage was built by the Sulpicians over the years 1824 to 1829, to serve as a parish church. It is one of the oldest examples of Gothic Revival religious architecture in Canada. At the time it was built, it was a daring, innovative edifice on a scale unequalled anywhere else in North America. The architect was James O’Donnell, an Irish immigrant to New York City. Its interior decor, which was overseen by Victor Bourgeau, along with its rich ornamentation, are unique and evoke a true sense of wonder in visitors. The Basilica is also one of the major tourist attractions in the city of Montréal.