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Article

Clyde Kirby Wells

In 1977 he was Newfoundland representative on a Canadian Bar Association committee on the Constitution and in 1981 he argued the government's case in the Newfoundland Supreme Court against the federal government's claim that it could unilaterally patriate the constitution.

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John Herbert Turner

John Herbert Turner, businessman, politician, premier of BC 1895-98 (b at Claydon, Eng 7 May 1834; d at Richmond, Eng 9 Dec 1923). A merchant in Halifax and Charlottetown, Turner moved in 1862 to Victoria, where in 1865 he established the firm of Turner, Beeton and Co.

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Andrew Rainsford Wetmore

Andrew Rainsford Wetmore, jurist, politician, premier of NB 1867-70 (b at Fredericton 16 Aug 1820; d there 7 Mar 1892). Born into a distinguished Loyalist family, Wetmore's father, George Ludlow Wetmore, was the last New Brunswicker killed in a formal duel (20 Oct 1821).

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Alexander Bannerman Warburton

Alexander Bannerman Warburton, historian, politician, premier of PEI 1897-98 (b at Charlottetown 5 Apr 1852; d there 14 Jan 1929). Warburton practised law in Charlottetown and won election as a Liberal to the provincial legislature in 1891.

Article

Brian Tobin

Brian Vincent Tobin, PC, OC, politician, businessman, premier of Newfoundland and Labrador 1996-2000 (born 21 October 1954 in Stephenville, NF). Before serving as Newfoundland and Labrador's sixth premier, Tobin became a hero in the province when, as a federal Cabinet minister, he defended the turbot fishery against foreign overfishing. Nicknamed “Captain Canada,” he was also a strong advocate of national unity during Québec's 1995 referendum on sovereignty.

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Glen Clark

Re-elected in the NDP landslide in 1991, Clark was rewarded by premier Mike HARCOURT with a Cabinet appointment as Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations. In addition Clark was named Government House Leader.

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Camille Thériault

Camille Henri Thériault, politician, businessman, premier of New Brunswick 1998-1999 (born 25 February 1955 in Baie-Sainte-Anne, NB). Thériault served in the Cabinet of Liberal Premier Frank McKenna before briefly taking a turn as premier himself. After politics, he was chair of the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board, and served as CEO of the Mouvement des caisses populaires acadiennes.

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John Hamm

John Frederick Hamm, premier of Nova Scotia 1999-2006, physician, politician, (born 8 April 1938 in New Glasgow, NS). After a career as a family physician, Hamm moved into provincial politics in 1993 and became premier in 1999 — the first premier in 40 years to balance the province’s budget.

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Charles Avery Dunning

Dunning, Charles Avery, businessman, politician, premier of Saskatchewan (b at Croft, Eng 31 July 1885; d at Montréal 1 Oct 1958). General manager of the Saskatchewan Co-operative Elevator Company, Dunning entered provincial politics in 1916 when opposition to both national parties was spreading.

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John Duncan MacLean

John Duncan MacLean, politician, premier of BC 1927-28 (b at Culloden, PEI 8 Dec 1873; d at Ottawa 28 Mar 1948). He taught in prairie schools and in BC, and became a principal in Rossland, BC, before going to McGill.

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Daniel Johnson, Jr.

Daniel Johnson, GOQ, business leader, politician and premier of Québec (born 24 December 1944 in Montréal, Québec). The Vice-President of Power Corporation of Canada from 1978 to 1981, Johnson also served as a member of Québec’s National Assembly for over 25 years. After the resignation of Premier Robert Bourassa, Johnson was elected leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and on 11 January 1994, he became the 25th premier of Québec. However, he held on to this position for only eight months: in September 1994, the Liberals lost the Québec general election to the Parti Québécois. Johnson then served as leader of the Official Opposition for nearly three years, successfully leading the “No” camp in the Québec referendum campaign of 1995. He left politics in May 1998 and subsequently worked as a lawyer and as a negotiator for the government of Québec, while also sitting on several boards of directors.

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Frederick Charles Alderdice

Frederick Charles Alderdice, businessman, politician (b at Belfast, Ire 10 Nov 1872: d at St John's 26 Feb 1936). He was twice prime minister of Newfoundland, August-November 1928 and June 1932-February 1934, and the last person to hold that office before confederation with Canada.

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Catherine Callbeck

In 1988 she returned to politics, this time at the federal level, winning the PEI riding of Malpeque for the Liberals. Following the resignation of PEI premier Joe Ghiz, Callbeck announced she wished to succeed him.

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David Alward

David Nathan Alward, civil servant, consultant, politician, diplomat, premier of New Brunswick 2010–14 (born 2 December 1959 in Beverly, Massachusetts). Alward was a federal civil servant, and a private consultant, before making the move to provincial politics in 1999. He was elected premier of New Brunswick on 27 September 2010 and governed for four years. After his defeat in 2014, he was named Canada’s consul general in Boston.

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Darrell Dexter

Dexter was educated at Dalhousie University in Halifax where he earned degrees in education and law. He also has a journalism degree from the University of King's College in Halifax.

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Edward Stelmach

Edward Stelmach was first elected to the Alberta legislature under the Conservative banner in the 1993 provincial election. He subsequently held various government posts, including those of Deputy Whip and Chief Government Whip, before entering the Cabinet in 1997.

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Tommy Douglas and Eugenics

Tommy Douglas — the father of socialized medicine in Canada and one of the country’s most beloved figures — once supported eugenic policies. In 1933, he received a Master of Arts in sociology from McMaster University for his thesis, “The Problems of the Subnormal Family.” In the thesis, Douglas recommended several eugenic policies, including the sterilization of “mental defectives and those incurably diseased.” His ideas were not unique, as two Canadian provinces (and 32 American states) passed sexual-sterilization legislation in the 1920s and 1930s. However, by the time Douglas became premier of Saskatchewan in 1944, he had abandoned his support for eugenic policies. When Douglas received two reports that recommended legalizing sexual sterilization in the province, he rejected the idea.

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Dave Barrett

David Barrett, OC, OBC, 26th premier of British Columbia 1972–75, member of parliament 1988–93, MLA 1960–83, social worker (born 2 October 1930 in Vancouver, BC; died 2 February 2018 in Victoria, BC). Barrett led the first New Democratic Party government in British Columbia, a short-lived but prolific administration that passed more than 400 bills in three years. The Barrett government created the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, the Agricultural Land Reserve and the province’s PharmaCare program. He was the first premier of Jewish heritage in Canada.