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Tommy Douglas and Eugenics

Tommy Douglas — the father of socialized medicine in Canada and one of the country’s most beloved figures — once supported eugenic policies. In 1933, he received a Master of Arts in sociology from McMaster University for his thesis, “The Problems of the Subnormal Family.” In the thesis, Douglas recommended several eugenic policies, including the sterilization of “mental defectives and those incurably diseased.” His ideas were not unique, as two Canadian provinces (and 32 American states) passed sexual-sterilization legislation in the 1920s and 1930s. However, by the time Douglas became premier of Saskatchewan in 1944, he had abandoned his support for eugenic policies. When Douglas received two reports that recommended legalizing sexual sterilization in the province, he rejected the idea.

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Tommy Douglas

Thomas Clement (“Tommy”) Douglas, CC, premier of Saskatchewan, first leader of the New Democratic Party, Baptist minister and politician (born 20 October 1904 in Falkirk, Scotland; died 24 February 1986 in Ottawa, Ontario). Douglas led the first socialist government elected in Canada and is recognized as the father of socialized medicine in Canada. He also helped establish democratic socialism in mainstream Canadian politics.

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Nellie J. Cournoyea

Nellie J. Cournoyea, OC, politician, premier of the Northwest Territories 1991–95 (born on 4 March 1940 in Aklavik, NT). Cournoyea is the first Indigenous woman to lead a provincial or territorial government in Canada.

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W.A.C. Bennett

William Andrew Cecil Bennett, PC, OC, premier of British Columbia 1952-72, merchant, politician, (born 6 September 1900 in Hastings, NB; died 23 February 1979 in Kelowna, BC). Bennett led his province during a period of unparalleled economic expansion and is the longest serving premier in BC history.

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Clark's New Job

On Monday of last week, Glen Clark, ex-New Democrat premier of B.C., was hanging off the side of an office tower 28 floors above downtown Vancouver. He didn't have a noose around his neck, as some in the business community might wish. Far from it.

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Brian Gallant

​Brian Alexander Gallant, lawyer, leader of New Brunswick Liberal Party, 33rd premier of New Brunswick 2014–18 (born 27 April 1982 in Shediac Bridge, New Brunswick). Gallant was elected premier of New Brunswick on 23 September 2014, when his party won a majority government; at 32 years of age, he became the country’s youngest premier. However, in the September 2018 provincial election, the Liberal Party lost their majority. Gallant resigned as premier after losing a confidence vote in November 2018 and was replaced by Progressive Conservative Blaine Higgs.

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John Horgan

John Joseph Horgan, 36th premier of British Columbia, 2017–present; political aide (born 7 August 1959 in Victoria, BC). John Horgan worked as a political staffer for BC New Democratic Party (NDP) premiers Mike HarcourtGlen Clark and Dan Miller. In 2005, he became a member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia for the riding of Malahat-Juan de Fuca. He then revitalized the BC NDP after it had spent 16 years on the opposition benches. Following the 2017 election, Horgan engineered a power-sharing coalition with the Green Party to topple a weakened Liberal regime. After Horgan called a snap election in October 2020, the NDP won 53 of 87 seats and Horgan converted his minority government into a governing majority.

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Eva Aariak

Eva Aariak, politician, second premier of Nunavut (born 10 January 1955 in Arctic Bay, Northwest Territories [now Nunavut]). Eva Aariak has the distinction of being Nunavut’s first female premier, and she has been instrumental in the promotion of Inuit languages in the territory. (See also Inuktitut and Indigenous Languages in Canada.)

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Hugh John Flemming

Hugh John Flemming, lumberman, politician, premier of NB (b at Peel, NB 5 Jan 1899; d at Fredericton 16 Oct 1982). Elected in 1921 as a municipal councillor for Carleton, Flemming became Conservative Member of Legislative Assembly for Carleton in 1944.

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George Luther Hatheway

George Luther Hatheway, farmer, lumberman, politician, premier of NB (b at Musquash, NB 4 Aug 1813; d at Fredericton 5 July 1872). Elected in 1850 as Reform MLA for York and defeated in 1857, he was re-elected in 1861 and named chief commissioner of public works by S.L. TILLEY.

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Gordon Muir Campbell

His political career began in 1984 with his election to Vancouver City Council. Two years later, Campbell became mayor, an office he held until 1993. During that time, he also served as president of the Union of BC Municipalities and chaired the Greater Vancouver Regional District.

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Henry Joseph Clarke

Henry Joseph Clarke, lawyer, politician, premier of Manitoba 1872-74 (b in Donegal, Ire 7 July 1833; d on a train near Medicine Hat, Alta 13 Sept 1889). Admitted to the bar 1855, Clarke practised law in Montréal and spent several years in California and El Salvador.

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Henry Hicks

Henry Davies Hicks, lawyer, politician, university president, philatelist, premier of NS 1954-56 (b at Bridgetown, NS 5 Mar 1915; d at St Croix, NS 9 Dec 1990).

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George Henry Murray

George Henry Murray, lawyer, politician, premier of Nova Scotia (b at Grand Narrows, NS 7 June 1861; d at Montréal 6 Jan 1929). Murray's unbroken 27 years in power (1896-1923) is a British Empire and Commonwealth record. Leadership of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party fell to Murray when W.S.

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Catherine Callbeck

In 1988 she returned to politics, this time at the federal level, winning the PEI riding of Malpeque for the Liberals. Following the resignation of PEI premier Joe Ghiz, Callbeck announced she wished to succeed him.