Search for "indigenous families system"

Displaying 61-80 of 126 results
Article

Forestry Education

Throughout the late 1980s and the 1990s, there was a tremendous evolution of FORESTRY in Canada and around the world. Forestry became increasingly important for both the ECONOMY and the ENVIRONMENT, and the practice of forestry became more complex.

Article

Special Education

​Special education is typically described as an approach designed to serve exceptional students who either have physical disabilities, developmental disorders, behavioral disorders or challenges with learning, or who are gifted.

Article

Community College

The community college is a public post-secondary educational institution that offers a variety of programs to high-school graduates and adults seeking further education or employment training.

Macleans

University Education in Crisis

Years and years ago, long before they invented e-mail or notebook computers, way before parents began panicking about student-faculty ratios or the double cohort, I packed up my favourite books and my brand new miniskirts and headed off for a four-year stint at QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY.

Article

Libraries

 The earliest libraries in Canada were private collections belonging to immigrants from Europe. The first known library belonged to Marc LESCARBOT, a scholar and advocate who came to PORT-ROYAL in 1606.

Article

Music Education

Music education in Canada has progressed from rustic beginnings in the colonial period to the present time when music training is available both for amateurs and professionals, and, indeed, is an increasingly important facet of general education.

Article

Acadia University

Acadia University is located in Wolfville, NS. In 1828, the Baptist Education Society of Nova Scotia founded Horton Academy in Horton [Wolfville], NS. Ten years later in 1838, the Baptists established Queen's College, sharing the Horton facilities.

Article

Media Literacy

Media literacy refers to the ability to interpret and understand how various forms of media operate, and the impact those media can have on one’s perspective on people, events or issues. To be media literate is to understand that media are constructions, that audiences negotiate meaning, that all media have commercial, social and political implications, and that the content of media depends in part on the nature of the medium. Media literacy involves thinking critically and actively deconstructing the media one consumes. It also involves understanding one’s role as a consumer and creator of media and understanding the ways in which governments regulate media.

Macleans

TV and Kids' Violence

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 17, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

Nick Workman's favorite program is The X-Men, a cartoon featuring mutant superheroes with names like Gambit, Rogue and Wolverine - the latter a misanthropic man-beast whose razor-sharp claws have a hair trigger. "I like the action," says Nick. "I like it when they use their powers.

Article

Piano Playing and Teaching

The piano has maintained a position of prominence in many Canadian homes since the late 18th century. Canadians have thrived on this instrument, and Canada has produced some of the best pianists, piano instructors, and piano methods in the latter part of the 20th century.

Article

Emilien Dufresne (Primary Source)

Emilien Dufresne was a solider with the Royal 22e Régiment during the Second World War. He was one of 14,000 Canadian soldiers who stormed Juno Beach on 6 June 1944. Learn Dufresne’s story of being taken prisoner by the Germans, forcefully put to work in a sugar factory, and how he was liberated.

Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Bible Schools

Bible colleges, institutes and seminaries are mainly sponsored by the Evangelical Protestant churches in Canada, although there are several Roman Catholic institutions in Canada. One of the first lay colleges in North America was established by T. Dewitt Talmage in 1872, in a church in Brooklyn, New York.

Article

University of Manitoba

In 1900 the university became a teaching institution by an act of the provincial legislature. Thereafter, other colleges also received affiliated status: the Manitoba College of Pharmacy (1902); Manitoba Agricultural College (1906); St Paul's College (Roman Catholic) and Brandon College (1938).

Article

Université de Sherbrooke

The Université de Sherbrooke is a public francophone university. It has distinguished itself with its co-operative education program, which gradually integrates students into the workforce through alternating sessions of academic study and paid internships in professional working environments. The university has three campuses: two in the town of Sherbrooke (Eastern Townships) and one in the town of Longueuil (Montérégie).