Search for "liberal"

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Walter Edward Foster

Walter Edward Foster, businessman, politician, premier of New Brunswick 1917-23 (b at St Martins, NB 9 Apr 1873; d at Saint John 14 Nov 1947). Chosen Liberal Opposition leader in 1916 and premier following the Liberal victory in 1917 he sat for Victoria in 1917 and Saint John City in 1920.

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Thomas Greenway

Thomas Greenway, merchant, farmer, land speculator, politician, premier of Manitoba (b at Kilkhampton, Eng 25 Mar 1838; d at Ottawa 30 Oct 1908). Instrumental in the formation of the Liberal Party of Manitoba, Greenway was its first leader and premier of Manitoba 1888-1900.

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C.D. Howe

Clarence Decatur Howe, engineer, politician (b at Waltham, Mass 15 Jan 1886; d at Montréal 31 Dec 1960). Howe was the most successful businessman-politician of his day, and provided a link between the Liberal Party and Canadian industry.

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Patricia Duncan

Patricia (Pat) Duncan, business woman, politician, premier of Yukon (b at Edmonton, Alta, 8 Apr 1960). Duncan received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Carleton University in 1983. She then became Special Assistant (Constituency Affairs) in the office of Yukon MP Erik NIELSEN.

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John Kenneth Galbraith

John Kenneth Galbraith, economist, writer (b at Iona Station, Ont 15 Oct 1908; d at Cambridge, Mass 29 Apr 2006). Having graduated from Ontario Agricultural College (Guelph) in 1931, Galbraith received a doctorate in agricultural economics at University of California, Berkeley.

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Stephen McNeil

Stephen McNeil, business owner, politician, 28th premier of Nova Scotia, 2013–21 (born 10 November 1964 in Halifax, NS). Few observers expected much from refrigerator repairman Stephen McNeil when he was first elected to the Nova Scotia legislature in 2003. But he surprised pundits when he became leader of the Liberal Party, and was twice elected premier, winning majority governments in 2013 and 2017.

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Eric William Kierans

Eric William Kierans, OC, economist, politician, businessman (born 2 February 1914 in Montreal, Quebec; died 10 May 2004 in Montreal). Educated at Loyola College and McGill University, Kierans was director of the School of Commerce at McGill 1953–60, president of the Montreal Stock Exchange 1960–63 and then minister of communications and postmaster general of Canada 1968–71. He served in two governments — Jean Lesage's  Quiet Revolution (in which he served as minister of revenue 1963–65 and as minister of health 1965–66) and Pierre Trudeau's first Cabinet.

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Dwight Ball

Dwight Ball, pharmacist, businessman, premier of Newfoundland and Labrador 2015–20, leader of the Liberal Party of Newfoundland and Labrador 2013–20 (born 21 December 1957 in Deer Lake, NL). Ball became premier at a time of economic crisis. After several years of prosperity, slumping oil revenues required his government to bring in unpopular austerity measures to fight a burgeoning provincial debt. Ball retained the premiership in 2019, when his Liberal Party won a minority government. On 17 February 2020, Dwight Ball announced his intention to resign as premier of Newfoundland and Labrador. He remained in that position until 19 August 2020, when Andrew Furey was sworn in as premier. (See also Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador.)

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Robert Henry Winters

Robert Henry Winters, politician, businessman (b at Lunenburg, NS 18 Aug 1910; d at Monterey, Calif 10 Oct 1969). Educated at Mt Allison U and Massachusetts Inst of Technology, Winters joined Northern Electric in Montréal in 1934. He became a lt-col in the army in WWII.

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Byron Ingemar Johnson

Byron Ingemar Johnson, "Boss," businessman, politician, premier of BC 1947-52 (b at Victoria 10 Dec 1890; d there 12 Jan 1964). After service in WWI, Johnson and his brothers formed a building supply company in Victoria. Elected as a Liberal in Victoria in 1933, he was defeated in 1937.

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Daniel Johnson, Jr.

Daniel Johnson, GOQ, business leader, politician and premier of Québec (born 24 December 1944 in Montréal, Québec). The Vice-President of Power Corporation of Canada from 1978 to 1981, Johnson also served as a member of Québec’s National Assembly for over 25 years. After the resignation of Premier Robert Bourassa, Johnson was elected leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and on 11 January 1994, he became the 25th premier of Québec. However, he held on to this position for only eight months: in September 1994, the Liberals lost the Québec general election to the Parti Québécois. Johnson then served as leader of the Official Opposition for nearly three years, successfully leading the “No” camp in the Québec referendum campaign of 1995. He left politics in May 1998 and subsequently worked as a lawyer and as a negotiator for the government of Québec, while also sitting on several boards of directors.

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Mike Savage

Michael John Savage, businessman, politician, mayor of Halifax, 2012 to present (born 13 May 1960 in Belfast, Northern Ireland). Savage, whose father was premier of Nova Scotia in the 1990s, served as a member of Parliament before becoming mayor of the Halifax Regional Municipality.

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Charles Woodward

Charles Woodward, merchant, politician (b in Wentworth County, Canada W 19 July 1842; d at Vancouver 2 June 1937). After failing as a farmer and having mixed success as a merchant on Manitoulin Island and at Thessalon, Ont, Woodward decided that Vancouver offered better opportunities.

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Leo Kolber

Ernest Leo Kolber, OC, businessman, philanthropist, senator (born 18 January 1929 in Montreal, QC; died 9 January 2020 in Montreal). Leo Kolber was a pillar of Canada’s business, political and philanthropic communities for more than 50 years. He was perhaps best known as a long-time advisor to the Bronfman family. Kolber also ran the successful real estate firm Cadillac Fairview Corporation, as well as holding companies that administered the Bronfman family trust. He served in the Senate of Canada from 1983 to 2004, most notably as chairman of the Standing Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce. He was also the Liberal Party’s chief fundraiser for many years and chair of the Advisory Council on National Security from 2005 to 2007. An Officer of the Order of Canada, he was recognized for his many charitable and philanthropic contributions.

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Thomas Dufferin Pattullo

Faced with the tremendous economic and social problems of the GREAT DEPRESSION, Pattullo was innovative in extending the role of government. His frustration with the limitations of provincial power led to a battle with Ottawa that resulted in a reappraisal of Canadian federalism.

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Daniel Williams

In addition to practising law, Williams excelled at business. While attending Dalhousie's law school, he led a group of businesspeople to seek the first cable licence in Newfoundland and built Cable Atlantic into one of the largest communications companies in Atlantic Canada.

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Camille Thériault

Camille Henri Thériault, politician, businessman, premier of New Brunswick 1998-1999 (born 25 February 1955 in Baie-Sainte-Anne, NB). Thériault served in the Cabinet of Liberal Premier Frank McKenna before briefly taking a turn as premier himself. After politics, he was chair of the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board, and served as CEO of the Mouvement des caisses populaires acadiennes.

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Clifford William Robinson

Clifford William Robinson, lawyer, businessman, premier of NB 1907-08 (b at Moncton, NB 1 Sept 1866; d at Montréal 27 July 1944). In 1897 Robinson was elected mayor of Moncton and a member of the provincial Assembly.

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James William Carmichael

James William Carmichael, shipbuilder-owner, merchant, politician (b at New Glasgow, NS 16 Dec 1819; d there 1 May 1903). Carmichael, son of New Glasgow's founder, James Carmichael, became its most prominent merchant, shipbuilder and shipowner.

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Sir Clifford Sifton

Sir Clifford Sifton, PC, KCMG, KC, lawyer, politician, businessman (born 10 March 1861 near Arva, Canada West; died 17 April 1929 in New York City, New York). Sir Clifford Sifton was one of the ablest politicians of his time. He is best known for his aggressive promotion of immigration to settle the Prairie West. Under his leadership, immigration to Canada increased significantly; from 16,835 per year in 1896 to 141,465 in 1905. A Liberal politician of considerable influence and vision, he was also a controversial figure. Sifton promoted a single education system and opposed the public funding of denominational schools, largely disregarding the concerns of French Catholics. He also showed little interest in the Indigenous peoples of the Prairies; he oversaw cuts to Indigenous education and approved Treaty 8. His brother, Arthur Lewis Sifton, was premier of Alberta from 1910 to 1917.