Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 1-20 of 115 results
Article

SARS in Canada

Canada experienced an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. Most of the infections originated in Toronto hospitals. The outbreak led to the quarantine of thousands, killed 44 people and took an economic toll on Toronto. It also exposed the country’s ill-prepared health-care system. Confusion around SARS fuelled an uptick in anti-Asian and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

Article

Influenza (Flu) in Canada

Influenza, often referred to as the flu, is a common, contagious respiratory illness. There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D. While influenza A, B and C viruses can infect humans, influenza D is believed to primarily affect animals such as cattle and pigs. Influenza C is rare in comparison to influenza A and B, which are the main sources of the “seasonal flu,” or the viruses that circulate in Canada and other countries each winter. Influenza A is also the source of flu pandemics. Canada has experienced five influenza pandemics since the late 19th century, in 1890, 1918, 1957, 1968 and 2009. In Canada, influenza causes an estimated 12,200 hospitalizations and 3,500 deaths each year.

Article

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) has been known and dreaded since Hippocratic times (460-377 BCE). It was once known as "consumption" and claimed the lives of such famous people as the Brontë sisters, Robert Louis Stevenson and Vivian Leigh.

Macleans

SARS Epidemic Reaches Canada

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 31, 2003. Partner content is not updated.

"SEVERE acute respiratory syndrome" hardly rolls off the tongue with ease, but it may yet ingrain itself into the popular lexicon - not necessarily for its virulence, but for the lessons it offers.

Macleans

Bottled Water Debate

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 12, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

On a remote hillside about 50 km northeast of Walkerton, Ont., springwater flows to the surface to form a clear pool. The area, surrounded by trees and about 1.5 km from the nearest farm, is fenced. Every month, Echo Springs Water Co. Ltd. employees pump about 4.

Article

Cholera in Canada

Cholera first reached Canada in 1832, brought by immigrants from Britain. Epidemics occurred in 1832, 1834, 1849, 1851, 1852 and 1854. There were cases in Halifax in 1881. The epidemics killed at least 20 000 people in Canada.

Macleans

Melatonin Banned

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 18, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

That frustration is fuelled not only by melatonin's proven ability to counter insomnia and jet lag, but also by an array of experts touting it as a wonder drug that can extend life and help to combat a wide variety of illnesses, including AIDS, cancer and epilepsy.

Article

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Canada

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness that affects individuals exposed to trauma (although not all people exposed to trauma develop PTSD). Studies suggest that over 70 per cent of Canadians have been exposed to at least one traumatic event in their lifetime, and that nearly 1 out of 10 Canadians may develop PTSD at some point in their lives. PTSD can affect adults and children and can appear months or even years after exposure to the trauma.

Article

Physical Anthropology

Human biological history is most directly told by the fossil record. Although early hominid remains (fossils in the human line) are not found in the Western Hemisphere, Canadians have contributed significantly to paleontology.

Article

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease in Canada. Canadians have one of the highest rates of MS in the world with a prevalence of about one case for every 500-1000 people.

Macleans

Ebola Virus Strikes Again

The virus first makes its presence felt when the victim runs a high temperature, followed by vomiting, chest pains and skin rashes. Then hemorrhaging develops - from the eyes and ears, the stomach and the bowels.

Macleans

Health-care Rankings

I think it is obvious that when you're spending $80 billion a year as Canadians do on health care, there's a need to know more about what we're getting for our money. - Health Minister Allan Rock, Feb.

Macleans

High Cost of Healing

Despite how it may seem some days as the public tunes into the debate over health-care funding, governments in Canada have not turned off the tap. Canadians spent an estimated $76.6 billion on health care in 1997, up from $75.

Article

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs that is marked by recurring episodes of airway obstruction. It is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting Canadians. Asthma often begins in childhood, but initial onset can occur at any age.