Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 41-60 of 70 results
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Marguerite Pâquet

(Jeanne Mathilde) Marguerite Pâquet. Contralto, teacher, b Quebec City 10 Nov 1916, d there 29 Nov 1981; B MUS (Laval) 1939. She began to study voice with Sister Saint-Jean-de-l'Eucharistie at the Collège Jésus-Marie de Sillery and at the same time performed as a soloist at St-Dominique Church.

Article

Frank Churchley

Frank (Franklin Eugene) Churchley. Educator, author, pianist, b Oshawa, Ont, 15 Jun 1930; B MUS (Toronto) 1950, LRCT 1952, MA (Columbia) 1957, D ED (Columbia) 1959. His thesis was 'The piano in Canadian music education'.

Article

Laure Waridel

Laure Waridel, CM, CQ, social activist, author, environmentalist, lecturer and columnist (born 10 January 1973 in Chesalles-sur-Oron, Switzerland). Regarded as one of the 25 most influential political personalities in Québec, Laure Waridel holds an honorary doctorate from the Université du Québec à Rimouski, the Insigne du mérite from the Université de Montréal, and the rank of Knight of the Order of La Pléiade. She is a co-founder of Équiterre, a Québec organization that encourages individuals and governments to make choices that are fair, ecological and consistent with the principles of solidarity. The author of a number of books and essays on environmental issues, Waridel has contributed to many magazines, such as Voir and Reader’s Digest, in addition to hosting the radio show Acheter, c’est voter on Radio-Canada. She is currently strategic advisor for CIRODD, an interdisciplinary centre for research on operationalization of sustainable development. This centre is based at Polytechnique Montréal, and its membership includes over 80 researchers.

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Cecil Scott Burgess

Cecil Scott Burgess, architect, professor (b at Bombay (Mumbai), India 4 Oct 1870; d at Edmonton 12 Nov 1971). Cecil Scott Burgess helped bring English Arts and Crafts architectural and design ideals into Canada. His public lectures provided a bridge between the profession and the public.

Macleans

Robertson Davies: A Farewell

All mortals are replaceable, runs the modern mantra, betraying the ethic of programmed obsolescence that has come to dominate our culture. But there are exceptions, and one of them - Robertson Davies - died last week, leaving a gap in the Canadian conscience that can never be filled.

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Marek Jablonski

Marek Jablonski. Pianist, teacher, b Krakow, Poland, 5 Nov 1939, d Edmonton 8 May 1999. He studied at the Krakow Conservatory when he was six. His family settled in Edmonton in 1949, but it was in Calgary and Banff during the summers that he continued his piano studies with Gladys Egbert.

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Hugh Fraser

Hugh (Alexander) Fraser. Pianist, trombonist, composer, teacher, b Victoria, BC, 26 Oct 1958; hon LLD (McMaster 2004). Hugh Fraser's father, Ken, was a percussionist with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the late 1930s.

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Ronald Turini

Ronald Turini. Pianist, teacher, b Montreal 30 Sep 1934; premier prix (CMM) 1950. Born of a US-Italian father and a Canadian mother of Danish origin, he had piano lessons as a very young child from his mother and from Frank Hanson at the McGill Cons.

Article

Charles Foreman

Charles (Lindsay) Foreman. Pianist, teacher, b East Chicago, Ind, 11 May 1949; B MUS (Indiana) 1971, Artist Diploma (Toronto) 1972, M MUS (Toronto) 1973. Before moving to Canada in 1972 Foreman studied piano with Rudolf Reuter in Chicago and Abbey Simon at Juilliard.

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Pierre Mollet

Pierre Mollet. Baritone, teacher, organizer, choir conductor, b Neuchâtel, Switzerland, 23 Mar 1920, naturalized Canadian 1974, d Montréal 22 Oct 2007; premier prix performance (Lausanne Cons) 1946.

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William Needles

William (Bill) Needles, CM, actor, teacher (born 2 January 1919 in Yonkers, New York; died 12 January 2016 in Alliston, Ontario) William Needles is best known as a founding member of the Stratford Festival, where he appeared in over 100 roles.

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Black Enslavement in Canada (Plain-Language Summary)

The practice of slavery was introduced by colonists in New France in the early 1600s. The practice was continued after the British took control of New France in 1760 (see British North America.) For about two hundred years, thousands of Indigenous and Black African people were bought, sold, traded and inherited like property in early Canada. Slavery was abolished (made illegal) throughout British North America in 1834.

(This article is a plain-language summary of slavery in Canada. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry on Black Enslavement in Canada.)

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Francis Dhomont

Francis Dhomont. Composer, teacher, b Paris 2 Nov 1926. He studied in Paris with Ginette Waldmeier, Charles Koechlin and Nadia Boulanger. From 1944 to 1963, he composed for instruments and for voice, attempting to reconcile modality and atonality.

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Canada's "Founding Mothers" of French Immersion

Olga Melikoff, Murielle Parkes and Valerie Neale were leaders of the parent group behind the creation, in 1965, of Canada's first bilingual education program, at Margaret Pendlebury Elementary School in the Montreal suburb of Saint-Lambert, Quebec. Their education activism laid the groundwork for the French immersion system in Canada. As a result of their efforts, Melikoff, Parkes and Neale are often referred to as Canada’s “founding mothers" of French immersion.

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Joseph Patrick Ziegler

After moving to Toronto, Ziegler was hired immediately by THEATRE PASSE MURAILLE to act in October Soldiers (about the FLQ crisis) and for the CBC's radio version of Thornton Wilder's Our Town, starring Lorne GREENE, a play he would later direct.

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Françoise Aubut

Françoise Aubut-Pratte (née Aubut), organist, educator (born 5 September 1922 in St-Jérôme, QC; died 8 October 1984 in Montréal, QC).