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Article

Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Proposals

In 1970, the Canadian government introduced guidelines for the development of a pipeline corridor south from the Mackenzie River delta to Alberta and the United States. Energy companies have since proposed three separate projects to transport natural gas by pipeline along this route — the Arctic Gas Pipeline, the Foothills Pipeline and the Mackenzie Gas Project — with an oil pipeline likely to follow in the first two cases. However, due to high costs, engineering challenges, environmental concerns, Indigenous land claims and changing markets, none of these pipelines has been built.

Article

Mackenzie Highway

Eighty km northwest of Enterprise, a ferry connects with the highway to Yellowknife, and connecting roads to the east serve Fort Resolution and Fort Smith. The section from Enterprise to Hay River is now a separate highway. First built as an all-weather road, some of its length has been paved.

Article

Muscular Dystrophy Canada

Muscular Dystrophy Canada (MDC) was founded in 1954 by a group of parents who had children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Now a national voluntary health organization with offices across Canada, MDC is dedicated to fighting over 40 different neuromuscular disorders.

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Molluscan Resources

Although Canada's coastline is extensive and contains many diverse molluscan species, the resource is economically relatively small. In 1995 nearly 200 000 t valued at $114.5 million were taken.

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Metallurgy

Metallurgy is the art, science and technology of turning metals and alloys (i.e., materials consisting of two or more metals) into forms suitable for practical use.

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Medicine Bundles

Medicine bundles (also called “sacred bundles”), wrapped collections of spiritually significant items, were the focus of most Indigenous spiritual rituals in the Plains region (see Plains Indigenous Peoples in Canada). A bundle might be a few feathers wrapped in skin or a multitude of objects such as animal skins, roots, or stone pipes inside a rawhide bag.

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Mental Health

In the early years of the mental-health movement, mental health was often defined as the absence of symptoms of mental illness. Since that time, attempts have been made to relate mental health to a concept of psychological well-being and to certain capacities of individuals, eg, the capacity to perceive reality "objectively," to be flexible in meeting new situations and to understand another's point of view. However, no clear line divides the mentally healthy from the mentally unhealthy, and in addition, the definition of mental health is relative and is dependent on cultural context. The characteristics of a mentally healthy person in one milieu may seem very different from those of a mentally healthy person in another.

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Mukluk

Mukluks are soft hide boots designed by Inuit peoples for manoeuvrability and warmth in northern environments.

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Mineral

 A mineral is an element or chemical compound formed in nature, usually by inorganic processes. Minerals may be composed of one element such as carbon (DIAMOND) or GOLD, or of several elements.

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Lizard

Lizard is the common name for members of the most diverse of a group of living reptiles.

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Molybdenum

Molybdenum (Mo) is a silver-grey metallic element with an unusually high melting point (2610°C). It is an important alloying element in iron, steels and specialty alloys and is used frequently in combination with other ferrous additives.

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Muskeg

Muskeg (from Cree maskek and Ojibwe mashkiig, meaning “grassy bog”) is a type of northern landscape characterized by a wet environment, vegetation and peat deposits. Chiefly used in North America, the term muskeg escapes precise scientific definition. It encompasses various types of wetlands found in the boreal zone, including bogs, fens, swamps and mires. In Canada, muskeg and other peatlands cover up to 1.2 million km2, or 12 per cent of the country’s surface.

Article

Noronic

Noronic was a Great Lakes steamer of the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd, built at Port Arthur, Ontario, in 1913. It was consumed by fire in Toronto at dockside on 17 September 1949. There was a tragic delay in summoning the fire department and 119 people died.