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Toronto Feature: The Grange

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Toronto Feature: The Junction

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Maison Saint-Gabriel

Maison Saint-Gabriel is a museum and historic site that openedin 1966. This 300-year-old building, located in Montréal’s Pointe-Sainte-Charles district, is one of the finest examples of the traditional architecture of New France.

Article

Fort Chambly

In 1813, during the WAR OF 1812, construction of a vast military complex was undertaken. Insufficient maintenance reduced Chambly to a dilapidated condition, and it was abandoned in 1851. Private restoration in 1882-83 preserved the site, which became Fort Chambly National Historic Park in 1921.

Macleans

Farewell to Montreal Forum

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 18, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

Yvon Lambert cherishes the memory of it still, the magic moment when he briefly wore the crown. Like so many Montreal fables, it is a story about hockey. And like most hockey stories in the city, it happened at the Forum, on a warm evening in May 17 years ago.

Article

Hebron Mission National Historic Site of Canada

For generations, Hebron, one of Nunatsiavut’s (see Labrador Inuit and Newfoundland and Labrador) most culturally important and significant sites, was an important meeting place for the Inuit, as well as a primary hunting and fishing area. In the early 1800s, Moravian missionaries chose the site to establish their fourth and northernmost mission in Labrador, officially opening the mission in 1830 (although missions were later established farther north, at Ramah in 1871 and Killinek in 1905). For more than 130 years, Hebron was a thriving community where an average of 200 to 250 Inuit lived. In 1959, without consultation with the Inuit, the community was closed, forcing all Inuit to relocate. Declared a National Historic Site in 1976 by the federal government, the Hebron Mission has been undergoing major restoration since 2004.

Article

Gastown

Gastown is a retail and commercial district in Vancouver, British Columbia. It is bounded by Cordova Street and the waterfront between Richards Street and Main Street. The original Gastown settlement formed the nucleus for the City of Vancouver and is now a National Historic Site. Today, Gastown is a popular tourist destination and home to restaurants, gift shops, boutiques, galleries, nightclubs and bars. It is also part of the Downtown Eastside, Vancouver’s lowest-income neighbourhood, and the location of single resident occupancy hotels, social housing and social services.

Article

Fort Ellice

Fort Ellice was a Hudson's Bay Company trading post located on Beaver Creek near the confluence of the Assiniboine and Qu'Appelle rivers, just east of the present-day Manitoba-Saskatchewan border. Established in 1831 by C.T.

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Kings Landing Historical Settlement

Kings Landing Historical Settlement is located 37 km west of Fredericton, NB. It was created in the late 1960s when the Mactaquac Dam threatened to flood many historic buildings in the Saint John River valley. Over 70 restored and reconstructed buildings and other structures are now located at Kings Landing to represent a New Brunswick settlement of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Lower Fort Garry

Lower Fort Garry was built 30 km down the Red River from Fort Garry [Winnipeg] during the 1830s as the Hudson's Bay Company's administrative centre for Rupert's Land. Although it never achieved the status originally intended, Lower Fort Garry served in a number of minor roles.

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Ross Farm

Ross Farm, at New Ross, NS, 28 km north of Chester, dates from 1816, when Captain William Ross led 172 disbanded soldiers into the Nova Scotia interior to establish an agricultural settlement.

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Balmoral Grist Mill

Balmoral Grist Mill in Balmoral Mills, NS, was built in about 1874 by Alexander MacKay. The mill is located on Matheson's Brook and was once just one of 5 mills on the brook. It was used to grind local stocks of wheat, oats, barley, rye and buckwheat to produce flour and oatmeal.

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Wile Carding Mill

Wile Carding Mill was established in BRIDGEWATER, NS, in 1860 and operated for over a century. In the 19th century the area around Bridgewater was an important sheep-rearing district and area farmers used the mill for carding and batting their wool. The wool was then spun or woven by farm families.

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Upper Canada

Upper Canada was the predecessor of modern-day Ontario. It was created in 1791 by the division of the old Province of Quebec into Lower Canada in the east and Upper Canada in the west. Upper Canada was a wilderness society settled largely by Loyalists and land-hungry farmers moving north from the United States. Upper Canada endured the War of 1812 with America, William Lyon Mackenzie’s Rebellion of 1837, the colonial rule of the Family Compact and half a century of economic and political growing pains. With the Act of Union in 1841, it was renamed Canada West and merged with Lower Canada (Canada East) into the Province of Canada.