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Boyd's Cove

Boyd's Cove, in eastern Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, has been occupied intermittently for about 2,000 years. Beothuk pit houses dating from the late 17th or the early 18th century have yielded stone tools lying nearby European artifacts.

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Prince of Wales Fort

Prince of Wales Fort is an 18th-century fortification built by the Hudson’s Bay Company at the mouth of the Churchill River, in what is now Manitoba. Today, it is a national historic site managed by Parks Canada.

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Bellevue House

In 1848-49 Bellevue was leased to John A. MacDonald, then a member of the Legislative Assembly and receiver general for the Province of Canada. Bellevue was purchased by Parks Canada in 1964 and is now operated as a national historic park. It has been restored to the late 1840s period.

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Ferryland Archaeological Site

The lowest levels have revealed campsites of the Beothuk, Newfoundland's now-extinct Native people. At the same levels evidence of European fishermen from Spain, Portugal, the Basque Provinces, Brittany and West Country England have been found.

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Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal

Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal is located at the intersection of Notre-Dame Street West and Saint-Sulpice Street in the borough of Ville-Marie in Montréal. This jewel of Québec’s religious heritage was built by the Sulpicians over the years 1824 to 1829, to serve as a parish church. It is one of the oldest examples of Gothic Revival religious architecture in Canada. At the time it was built, it was a daring, innovative edifice on a scale unequalled anywhere else in North America. The architect was James O’Donnell, an Irish immigrant to New York City. Its interior decor, which was overseen by Victor Bourgeau, along with its rich ornamentation, are unique and evoke a true sense of wonder in visitors. The Basilica is also one of the major tourist attractions in the city of Montréal.

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Historic Dunvegan

One of the most important fur trade sites on the PEACE RIVER, a post operated at Dunvegan from 1805 to 1918. The first post was built by Archibald Norman McLeod of the North West Company to trade with the BEAVER and other First Nations who lived in the middle and upper reaches of the Peace River.

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Fort Victoria

In 1842, James DOUGLAS of the HUDSON'S BAY CO selected the port of Camosack (the harbour where Victoria now stands) as a new fur-trade post - eventually to replace FORT VANCOUVER as the company's Pacific headquarters and to bolster the British claim to VANCOUVER ISLAND.

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Kennedy House

Kennedy House is a provincial HISTORIC SITE located just north of Winnipeg on River Road, the old highway that connected the RED RIVER COLONY between LOWER FORT GARRY and UPPER FORT GARRY.