Search for "south asian canadians"

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Wiarton

Wiarton, Ont, urban area, population 2291 (2011c), 2322 (2006c). Wiarton was a town (1894-1998) until it was merged into the new town of South Bruce Peninsula (incorporated 1999) along with the townships of Albemarle and Amabel

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Pointe-au-Père

In 1663, the Jesuit priest Henri Nouvel landed on the south bank of the St Lawrence River and conducted the first mass. In 1696 this territory was the seigneurie de Lessard, granted to Pierre Lessard and Barbe Fortin, his wife.

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Montreal's Little Italy

The product of two major Italian immigration cohorts to Canada (one from 1880 until the First World War, and the other from 1950 to 1970), Montreal’s Italian Canadian community has been gathering in the Notre-Dame-de-la-Défense parish since 1910. This neighbourhood, nestled within the Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie borough, is located along Saint-Laurent Boulevard, with Saint-Zotique and Jean-Talon streets marking its limits.

Always at the heart of Italian-Canadian community and cultural life in Montreal, Little Italy (Piccola Italia) is known for its buildings’ remarkable architecture and decor. It is also home to a true institution of Montreal’s cityscape: the Jean‑Talon Market.

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Ste-Scholastique

Ste-Scholastique, Qué, was made a parish in 1834, but the village of Ste-Scholastique ceased to exist when land was expropriated in 1969 for the construction of Mirabel Airport. It then became part of the new city of MIRABEL.

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Grande-Île

This rural municipality has become a residential suburb of Valleyfield and of Greater Montréal. Its population nearly doubled from 1981 to 1996. Even though manufacturing and construction industries play a major role in the local economy, agriculture is still prominent.

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Trois-Rivières-Ouest

The history of Trois-Rivières-Ouest is linked with that of the city of Trois-Rivières. Set up as a parish municipality in 1855, it remained rural and semi-rural in character for many years, its population quite small in comparison with that of its neighbour.

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Hudson

This wealthy residential suburb of Montréal is proud of its stately homes, and its residents also highly value a great variety of sports and cultural activities. The town's economy lacks an industrial base.

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Old Montreal

Old Montreal is the historic district of the city of Montreal, located in the south-central part of Montreal Island and bounded by the St. Lawrence River to the south, Saint-Antoine Street to the north, McGill Street to the west and Saint-Hubert Street to the east. In the second half of the 20th century, this area came under pressure from urban change, as business and port activity shifted elsewhere, depriving Old Montreal of its historic roles. But in the 1960s, a long process began that completely transformed it into a heritage district (it was at this time that the name Old Montreal came into common use). The designation of the Arrondissement historique de Montréal by the Quebec government in 1964 marked an important step in this transformation. With massive investments from the three levels of government, as well as from businesses and individuals, a lengthy rehabilitation effort began. Nearly 60 years later, visitors can now follow the traces of Montreal’s history back to pre-colonial times, and the changes that the city has undergone since the first European settlers arrived in 1642.

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Deux-Montagnes

The area was first developed for summer cottages. Later, its proximity to Montréal turned this locality into a residential suburb. Tourism and agriculture, once the mainstays of the local economy, have almost disappeared.

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Wawa

The original economic activity was gold prospecting, but for most of the 20th century, iron-ore deposits were the source of major economic activity. The ALGOMA CENTRAL RAILWAY was built to transport ore from area mines to Algoma Steel in SAULT STE MARIE.

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Sturgeon Falls

Sturgeon Falls, ON, population centre, population 6,798 (2016 census), 6,672 (2011 census). Sturgeon Falls is located 5 km up the Sturgeon River from Lake Nipissing. It was incorporated as a town in 1895. After a failed court challenge aimed at maintaining a separate identity (1997), Sturgeon Falls is now the administrative centre for the provincially-mandated town of West Nipissing (incorporated 1990).

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The Forks

The Forks is a public space where the Red and Assiniboine rivers meet in the heart of what is now the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. It occupies the waterfront zone east of Main Street and south of the CN mainline rail bridge. The Forks has played a complex role in the history of the region and of Canada as a whole. It has been a traditional gathering place for thousands of years and was an important hub of the fur trade in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many immigrants stopped at the Forks on their journey west. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1974 and is home to other sites of historical and archeological significance, as well as museums, monuments, parks and theatres.

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Sydney

Sydney, NS, Urban Community. Sydney is located near the eastern extremity of CAPE BRETON ISLAND. It is the centre of the second-largest urban complex in Nova Scotia, CAPE BRETON REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY (1995).

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Vancouver Chinatown

Vancouver's Chinatown features a distinctive hybrid of architectural styles that combines Chinese regional architecture with locally established Western motifs. The main streets in Chinatown follow a traditional Western grid pattern, while the north side is distinguished by interior courtyards, alleyways and façades that face both lanes and streets.