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Displaying 21-40 of 63 results
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Nueltin Lake

Nueltin Lake, 2279 km2, elev 278 m, max length 144 km, is located on the border of Nunavut and northeastern Manitoba, about 660 km south of the Arctic Circle. An irregularly shaped lake, it has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Lac Guillaume-Delisle

Lac Guillaume-Delisle, 712 km2, is a large, triangular, saltwater lake in northern Québec, connected to the eastern shore of Hudson Bay by Le Goulet, a 5 km long narrow channel.

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Lac La Ronge

Lac La Ronge, 1414 km2, elevation 364 m, is located in the rugged, sparsely populated Canadian Shield country of central Saskatchewan, 235 km north of Prince Albert. About 58 km long and studded with many islands, it drains northeast via the Rapid River into the Churchill River.

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Betula Lake

Betula Lake, Manitoba, is a freshwater lake and resort area in Whiteshell Provincial Park, 145 km by road northeast of Winnipeg. Opened to cottage development in the 1950s, Betula is a popular swimming, waterskiing and fishing area.

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Lake Louise

Lake Louise, 2.4 km long, elevation 1731 m, is located in Banff National Park in southwestern Alberta. Lake Louise's outlet is a creek flowing into the Bow River.

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Napaktulik Lake

Napaktulik Lake, 1080 km2, elevation 381 m, maximum length 60 km, is located in Nunavut almost on the Arctic Circle, 173 km south of Kugluktuk, NWT. The lake is fed by a tributary of the COPPERMINE RIVER and drains northeast to BATHURST INLET via the Hood River.

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Amadjuak Lake

Amadjuak Lake, 3115 km2, elevation 113 m, is one of 2 lakes situated in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak in south-central Baffin Island. This lower-lying area only emerged recently (in geological terms) from beneath the waters of Foxe Basin. Amadjuak Lake is the third-largest in Nunavut.

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Lake Timiskaming

Lake Timiskaming (Lac Témiscamingue), 304 km2, 108 km long, elev 180 m, is located on the Ontario and Québec border in the southwestern corner of Québec. Varying from a few hundred metres to 8 km in width, Lake Timiskaming straddles the boundary, half in Ontario and half in Québec.

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Lake Athabasca

Lake Athabasca is located in northeastern Alberta and northwestern Saskatchewan, at the edge of the Precambrian Shield. With an area of 7,935 km2 and a 2,140 km shoreline, it is the eighth-largest lake in Canada.

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Rideau Lakes

Rideau Lakes, 65 km2, elev 123 m, mean depth 12.3 m, is a commonly used collective name for 3 lakes: Big Rideau, Upper Rideau and Lower Rideau.

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Rainy Lake

Rainy Lake, 932 km2 (741 km2 in Canada), elev 338 m, is located in rough woodlands astride the Ont-Minn border, 240 km W of Lk Superior. It discharges into the Rainy R, which flows W along the border to LK OF THE WOODS.

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Reindeer Lake

Reindeer Lake, 6650 km2, elev 337 m, max length 233 km, located on the border between northeastern Saskatchewan and northwestern Manitoba, is the second-largest lake in Saskatchewan and ninth largest in Canada. It has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Lake St. Clair

Lake St. Clair, 1,114 km, elevation 175 m, average depth 3.7 m, is bordered by the province of Ontario to the east and the state of Michigan to the west. Almost circular in shape, it has a length of 42 km and a maximum width of 39 km. It is connected to Lake Huron to the north by the St. Clair River and drains into Lake Erie to the south via the Detroit River. Lake St. Clair is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, a significant transportation route stretching from Lake Superior through the Great Lakes to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The cities of Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, are located at the southwest end of the lake, making it a popular site for recreational fishing and boating.

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Lac Shawinigan

Shawinigan, Lac, 3.2 km2, 6.3 km long, 80 m deep, lies on Québec's Laurentian Plateau, 70 km north of Lac Saint-Pierre on the St Lawrence River. This lake of glacial gouging is prolonged to the east by Petit Lac Shawinigan, Lac Bernard and Lac en Croix.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

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Lake Superior

Lake Superior is one of the largest bodies of fresh water in the world, containing more water than all the other Great Lakes combined. With an area of 82,100 km2 (of which 28,750 km2 lies in Canada), when including the American portion, Lake Superior is Canada’s largest lake. It has a shoreline of 2,938 km, with the north shore bordering on Ontario and the south shore on the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The lake is 563 km long, 257 km wide, with a mean depth of 147 m and a maximum depth of 406 m. It has an elevation of 183 m.

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Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe, 744 km2, elevation 219 m, is situated in southern Ontario between Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario, 65 km north of Toronto. In the north, The Narrows divides it from Lake Couchiching at Orillia, and both lakes drain northwesterly via the Severn River to Georgian Bay.

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Lac Seul

Lac Seul, 1658 km2, elev 357 m, 55 m deep, located in northwestern Ontario, 50 km N of Dryden, drains W via the English and Winnipeg rivers to Lk Winnipeg.