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Lake Superior

Lake Superior is one of the largest bodies of fresh water in the world, containing more water than all the other Great Lakes combined. With an area of 82,100 km2 (of which 28,750 km2 lies in Canada), when including the American portion, Lake Superior is Canada’s largest lake. It has a shoreline of 2,938 km, with the north shore bordering on Ontario and the south shore on the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The lake is 563 km long, 257 km wide, with a mean depth of 147 m and a maximum depth of 406 m. It has an elevation of 183 m.

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Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe, 744 km2, elevation 219 m, is situated in southern Ontario between Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario, 65 km north of Toronto. In the north, The Narrows divides it from Lake Couchiching at Orillia, and both lakes drain northwesterly via the Severn River to Georgian Bay.

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Lac Seul

Lac Seul, 1658 km2, elev 357 m, 55 m deep, located in northwestern Ontario, 50 km N of Dryden, drains W via the English and Winnipeg rivers to Lk Winnipeg.

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Lake Winnipeg

The lake lies in a lowland basin that was scoured out of the limestone and shale bedrock by continental glaciers during the ice ages. When the glaciers finally melted, about 12 000 years ago, a large lake, Glacial Lake AGASSIZ, filled the entire basin.

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Lake Abitibi

Lake Abitibi, 932 km2, elev 265 m, straddles the Québec-Ontario border about 280 km south of James Bay.

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Red Lake

Red Lake, Ontario, incorporated as a municipality in 1998, population 4,107 (2016 census), 4,366 (2011 census). The municipality of Red Lake is located in northwestern Ontario on the shore of Red Lake, 555 km northwest of Thunder Bay. The municipality is the result of the amalgamation of the former townships of Red Lake (incorporated in 1960) and Golden (established in 1985), and the unorganized territory governed by the Madsen local services board. Red Lake consists of six communities (Madsen, Red Lake, Balmertown, Cochenour, McKenzie Island and Starratt-Olsen) that sprang up around the area's gold mines.

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Georgian Bay

In contrast to the soft, white limestone cliffs of the west shore, the east shore is cut into the hard edge of the Canadian Shield, fractured into myriad bays, inlets and sounds, with thousands of islands strewn along the coasts.

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Lac Mistassini

Lac Mistassini, 2335 km2, elevation 372 m, max length 161 km and width 19 km, is located in central Québec, 360 km east of JAMES BAY and 220 km northwest of Lac SAINT-JEAN.

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Lake Huron

Air masses from the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the Gulf of Mexico converge on the lake, which therefore experiences 4 distinct seasonal patterns and extremes of weather conditions.

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Aberdeen Lake

Aberdeen Lake, 1100 km2, elev 80 m, maximum length 91 km, is located in Nunavut, 213 km south of the Arctic Circle.

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Lake Nipissing

Located in Northern Ontario, between the Ottawa River and Georgian Bay, Lake Nipissing is the third largest lake located entirely within the boundaries of Ontario. The lake spans 65 km in an east–west direction and drains into Georgian Bay via the French River. Its name derives from an Ojibwa word meaning "little water," likely a comparison to the nearby Great Lakes, which were important trade routes for the Nbisiing (Nipissing), the First Nation indigenous to this region. Fishing is a popular activity on the lake both commercially and recreationally. Unfortunately, walleye, the lake’s dominant fish species, has declined drastically since the 1980s as a result of overfishing and ecosystem changes.

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Lac Bienville

Lac Bienville, 1249 km2, elevation 426 m, maximum length 89 km, is located in a sparsely populated region of northern Québec. This elongated lake, dotted with numerous islands, is fed by Lacs Louet and Ossant. It drains west, via the Grande Rivière de la Baleine (Great Whale River), into Hudson Bay.

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Lesser Slave Lake

The earliest non-Indigenous settlement in the area evolved at the west end of the lake, off Buffalo Bay, where the North West Company established a post (1802) and the Roman Catholic Church followed with a mission (1872).

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