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Lake Diefenbaker

Lake Diefenbaker is a reservoir lake south of Saskatoon, Sask. It was formed by the construction of 2 dams that created a widening in the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER as part of the South Saskatchewan River Development Project, inaugurated in 1958.

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Lake Abitibi

Lake Abitibi, 932 km2, elev 265 m, straddles the Québec-Ontario border about 280 km south of James Bay.

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Lake St. Clair

Lake St. Clair, 1,114 km, elevation 175 m, average depth 3.7 m, is bordered by the province of Ontario to the east and the state of Michigan to the west. Almost circular in shape, it has a length of 42 km and a maximum width of 39 km. It is connected to Lake Huron to the north by the St. Clair River and drains into Lake Erie to the south via the Detroit River. Lake St. Clair is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, a significant transportation route stretching from Lake Superior through the Great Lakes to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The cities of Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, are located at the southwest end of the lake, making it a popular site for recreational fishing and boating.

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Aberdeen Lake

Aberdeen Lake, 1100 km2, elev 80 m, maximum length 91 km, is located in Nunavut, 213 km south of the Arctic Circle.

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Dubawnt Lake

Dubawnt Lake, 3833 km2, elevation 236 m, is situated in the southern part of mainland Nunavut, 350 km south of the Arctic Circle. Within the Precambrian SHIELD, the lake has irregular shorelines and numerous islands.

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Lake of the Woods

Lake of the Woods, 4350 km2 (of which 3149 km2 are in Canada), elevation 323 m, fed by Rainy River from the south and drained to the northwest by the Winnipeg River; it is a remnant of former glacial Lake Agassiz.

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Nueltin Lake

Nueltin Lake, 2279 km2, elev 278 m, max length 144 km, is located on the border of Nunavut and northeastern Manitoba, about 660 km south of the Arctic Circle. An irregularly shaped lake, it has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Napaktulik Lake

Napaktulik Lake, 1080 km2, elevation 381 m, maximum length 60 km, is located in Nunavut almost on the Arctic Circle, 173 km south of Kugluktuk, NWT. The lake is fed by a tributary of the COPPERMINE RIVER and drains northeast to BATHURST INLET via the Hood River.

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Lac la Martre

Lac la Martre, 1777 km2, elev 265 m, max length 76 km, is located in the Northwest Territories, 50 km west of Behchokò and 150 km northwest of Yellowknife, and 346 km south of the Arctic Circle. The settlement of WHATÌ is located at the southeastern corner of the lake.

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Amadjuak Lake

Amadjuak Lake, 3115 km2, elevation 113 m, is one of 2 lakes situated in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak in south-central Baffin Island. This lower-lying area only emerged recently (in geological terms) from beneath the waters of Foxe Basin. Amadjuak Lake is the third-largest in Nunavut.

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Lesser Slave Lake

The earliest non-Indigenous settlement in the area evolved at the west end of the lake, off Buffalo Bay, where the North West Company established a post (1802) and the Roman Catholic Church followed with a mission (1872).

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Lake Nipigon

Later posts were established by the NWC and HBC, but none grew into major settlements. With its limited population, unspoiled environment and abundant fish and wildlife, the area is ideal for outdoor recreation.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

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Eskimo Lakes

Eskimo Lakes, 880 km2, lie along the southern edge of the Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula, NWT, and drain into Liverpool Bay on the Beaufort Sea. They are tidal lakes, with tide heights averaging 2 m, and occupy a fault zone separating geological blocks.

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Great Lakes

The Great Lakes are the largest group in a chain of large lakes (including WinnipegAthabascaGreat Slave and Great Bear) that lies along the southern boundary of the Canadian Shield. From west to east the Great Lakes comprise lakes Superior, Michigan (entirely in the US), HuronSt. ClairErie and Ontario. They have a total area of approximately 244,100 km2 and drop from 183 m above sea level at Lake Superior to 74 m at Lake Ontario — the most dramatic drop occurring at Niagara Falls. Lake St Clair, while not properly a “great lake,” is considered part of this Laurentian chain.