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Macleans

Inside the Rig

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 3, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

On this crisp, clear mid-February afternoon, the mechanical colossus - the so-called topsides of the Hibernia drilling rig - towers over the shimmering waters of Newfoundland's Bull Arm.

Macleans

TD Bids for Canada Trust

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 16, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

Edmund Clark is accustomed to trouble. Clark, 51, a career civil servant and financial services manager, was once nicknamed "Red Ed" for his role as one of the federal bureaucrats who designed the Trudeau government's National Energy Program in 1980.

Macleans

CN Cuts 3,000 More Jobs

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 2, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Necessary downsizing or corporate greed? Canadian National Railway Co.’s announcement last week of plans to slash 3,000 jobs quickly prompted those diametrically opposed views. CN executives said the cuts were required to make the company more competitive.

Macleans

Job Security and Outsourcing

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 30, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

So the meeting could have gone better. There was Mark Campbell, president of his own printing company, presenting to Kraft Canada Inc., executive level, in suburban Toronto. Initially, the meeting played exactly as Campbell had hoped.

Article

National Energy Program

The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the government of Canada from 1980 through 1985. Its goal was to ensure that Canada could supply its own oil and gas needs by 1990. The NEP was initially popular with consumers and as a symbol of Canadian economic nationalism. However, private industry and some provincial governments opposed it.

A federal-provincial deal resolved controversial parts of the NEP in 1981. Starting the next year, however, the program was dismantled in phases. Global economic conditions had changed such that the NEP was no longer considered necessary or useful. The development of the oil sands and offshore drilling, as well as the rise in Western alienation and the development of the modern Conservative Party of Canada, are all aspects of the NEP’s complicated legacy.

Macleans

Mutual Funds: Best and Worst

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on January 27, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

That, of course, is the pitch many mutual fund investors want to hear - and one the financial services industry is only too happy to pump out. But savvy investors know that in the markets, big returns often go hand in hand with big risks.

Article

Brewing Industry in Canada

Brewing in Canada evolved from a household necessity into a commercial industry that, while short lived in New France, grew rapidly under British rule. From its regional roots to national consolidation and the rise of the craft beer movement, the brewing industry has both shaped and adapted to Canadians’ tastes. Aside from a brief period of Prohibition, it has also been a large, stable source of tax income for governments. In 2016, beer accounted for roughly $13.6 billion of Canada’s gross domestic product, or 0.7 per cent of the economy. The industry employs nearly 149,000 people, or 0.8 per cent of Canadian workers.

Macleans

General Motors Strike Settled

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on October 28, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

For picketing Canadian autoworkers, it was a symbolic gesture. With the strike against General Motors of Canada Ltd. dragging into its third week, tempers flared at a cavernous GM plant in Oshawa, Ont.

Macleans

BC Telecom/Telus Merger

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on 8 March 1999. Partner content is not updated.

George Petty is a plain-speaking guy, not prone to superlatives. So when he told Telus Corp. shareholders last April that he wanted to turn the Alberta telecommunications company into one of the world’s "premier communications" firms, he was not bluffing.

Macleans

Bre-X Collapses

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 19, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

It was a cool night in Jakarta and the Shangri-La hotel was all aglitter. Valentine’s Day, 1997. Young couples swayed through the lobby, the ladies carrying helium heart-shaped balloons and single roses. A piano player sat at a full-sized grand, playing Johnny Mathis tunes.

Macleans

CIBC-TD Merger

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 27, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

This time, Paul Martin kept his cool. Last January, the Bank of Montreal and Royal Bank announced plans to merge and create one superbank, with assets of $453 billion.

Macleans

Cinar Scandal

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 20, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

As first days at the office go, it was the most bizarre in Peter Moss's career. On March 6, he reported for his first day as president of entertainment for Montreal-based children's TV programmer Cinar Corp. Moss arrived to find "the whole place had been turned upside down," he recalls.

Macleans

Bombardier's Success Story

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 11, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

In the aviation world, they still talk in hushed tones about the telephone call - the one in which BOMBARDIER Inc. coolly walked away from a billion-dollar sale. It happened in June, when all of the industry’s major players were gathered at the Paris Air Show.

Macleans

Merrill Lynch Buys Midland Walwyn

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on July 6, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

How's this for a long-range forecast? In 1989-1990, when a mid-sized Canadian investment brokerage called Midland Doherty Financial Corp. was running on empty, management did the rounds of all the big banks and fund managers in an attempt to sell enough cheap equity to keep the firm going.

Macleans

Sobeys' Empire

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 14, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

The big brick mansion breaks the gentle curve of the northwestern shore of Nova Scotia. Frank Sobey, the man who built Abercrombie House, lived on and off in the waterfront home until he died in 1985 at the age of 83.

Macleans

Eaton's Goes Bankrupt

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 30, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

It seemed like a simple, last-minute, prenuptial task. Jim Pole and Nicole Pelletier from Thunder Bay, Ont., were to be wed on Aug. 21 in the lush Montreal suburb of Vaudreuil. The day before the big event, they just wanted to pick up the groom's new $1,000 suit. After calling the T. EATON CO.