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Capitalism in Canada

Capitalism is an economic system in which private owners control a country’s trade and business sector for their personal profit. It contrasts with communism, in which property effectively belongs to the state (see also Marxism). Canada has a “mixed” economy, positioned between these extremes. The three levels of government decide how to allocate much of the country’s wealth through taxing and spending.

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Monty Quits as BCE CEO

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 6, 2002. Partner content is not updated.

In preparation for a meeting of the board on Friday, April 19 - five days before his surprise resignation shocked Canada's business community - Jean Monty spoke privately and individually with each of his 12 fellow directors. He wanted to talk through his strategy for beleaguered BCE INC.

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Cigarette Packaging

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on January 31, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

Perhaps, but if Rock gets his way cigarette packaging is about to go from colourful and cool to downright disturbing.

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Newcourt Merges with CIT

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 8, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

On May 5, hundreds turned up in their finest for the première of the National Ballet of Canada's revamped production of Swan Lake. Yet, as fabulous as artistic director James Kudelka's $1.6-million production was, an equally remarkable performance had taken place before the dancing ever started.

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Bronfman Sells DuPont

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 17, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Former film-maker Edgar Bronfman Jr. showed last week that he still has a flair for the dramatic. Investors and analysts were kept on the edge of their seats as the 39-year-old chief executive of Seagram Co. Ltd.

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Exxon and Mobil to Merge

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 14, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

On a chilly spring day in 1911, the decision reverberated through the executive offices of the Standard Oil Trust like a thunderclap: the world’s biggest oil company was to be broken into 34 corporate pieces by order of the U.S. government. Upon hearing this, John D.

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Mercedes-Chrysler Merge

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 18, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

No, Levi-Strauss is not in talks to merge with Italy's Armani. Nor, as far as anyone knows, is McDonald's planning to team up with a chain of snooty French restaurants.

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Eaton's Seeks Bankruptcy Protection

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 10, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

All had gathered to pay their last respects to Signy Eaton, the matriarch of the Eaton clan, widow of John David who had led the family's mighty retail chain in the halcyon days of the 1950s and 1960s, when the company controlled half of the country's department store sales.

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Martin's 1996 Budget

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 18, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

If Martin has his way, there will be one more budget - if only because he could then announce the virtual elimination of the federal deficit by the turn of the century.

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Thomson Sells His Newspapers

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 28, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

It was an empire built upon scratchy radio stations, weekly newspapers and the hardscrabble mentality of Northern Ontario in the midst of the Great Depression. Founder Roy Thomson was like nothing Canada had ever produced.

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Bre-X Strikes It Rich in Indonesia

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 3, 1997 Partner content is not updated.

John Felderhof is pacing like a panther. Boxed in a place he does not want to be. Hounded by people he does not like. He is grey-pale, his skin approximating the color of the smoke that rises from his Marlboro cigarette. Outside, the Jakarta air hangs at 30°C. The scenery is chaotic, Kodachromatic.

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Belgian Brewery Buys Labatt

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 19, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Then, three months ago, an opening suddenly appeared when takeover artist Gerald Schwartz of Toronto-based Onex Corp. began laying the groundwork for a hostile bid of $2.3 billion for John Labatt Ltd. of Toronto.

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Newcourt Credit

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 23, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Steven Hudson learned early about the power of performance-based compensation. As a teenager in Scarborough, Ont., he took a job at a bingo hall for seniors, pushing a refreshment cart up and down the aisles. The more chips and popcorn he sold, the more money he took home.

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Martin's 1995 Budget

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 13, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

A few minutes before Finance Minister Paul Martin was to deliver his budget speech in the House of Commons last week, he and Prime Minister Jean Chrétien met in Chrétien's second-floor office on Parliament Hill along with Martin's wife, Sheila, and Aline Chrétien.

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Women Hit Glass Ceiling

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on October 20, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

So a smattering of women have actually made it to the top of the heap, the corporate pinnacle, the apex of conventional business achievement. Canada now has women running 10 of the top 500 revenue-churning, publicly traded companies in the land. Huzzahs.

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Wal-Mart Causes a Revolution

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 6, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

Dashing from aisle to aisle in a newly opened Canadian Tire store in Newmarket, Ont., Stephen Bachand looks like a politician in mid-campaign. The U.S.-born businessman pumps hands with employees, shows off the building's features and passionately preaches about the "New Tire.

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Rogers Buys Vidéotron

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 21, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

On Bay Street they call him the king of cable, but Ted Rogers' ambitions have always extended far beyond the television set. For years, the founder and chief executive officer of Rogers Communications Inc.