Search for "black history"

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Strikes and Lockouts

A strike is the withholding of labour by workers in order to obtain better wages or working conditions. A lockout is the opposite, being the temporary shutdown of a business by an employer to compel employees to accept certain conditions.

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The Great Depression in Canada

The Great Depression of the early 1930s was a worldwide social and economic shock. Few countries were affected as severely as Canada. Millions of Canadians were left unemployed, hungry and often homeless. The decade became known as the Dirty Thirties due to a crippling drought in the Prairies, as well as Canada’s dependence on raw material and farm exports. Widespread losses of jobs and savings transformed the country. The Depression triggered the birth of social welfare and the rise of populist political movements. It also led the government to take a more activist role in the economy.

(This is the full-length entry about the Great Depression in Canada. For a plain-language summary, please see Great Depression in Canada (Plain-Language Summary).)

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International Economics

International economics consists of two main parts. The first is international trade theory and commercial policy. The second is international finance and balance of payments theory and policy.

Macleans

Eaton's Goes Bankrupt

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 30, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

It seemed like a simple, last-minute, prenuptial task. Jim Pole and Nicole Pelletier from Thunder Bay, Ont., were to be wed on Aug. 21 in the lush Montreal suburb of Vaudreuil. The day before the big event, they just wanted to pick up the groom's new $1,000 suit. After calling the T. EATON CO.

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McCarter Nairne

They began by designing houses and small apartment buildings. A breakthrough was the 1924 commission for the six-storey Devonshire Apartments, which were situated on a prominent downtown site.

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Analekta

​Analekta is a Canadian independent record label specializing in classical music. It was founded in 1988 by Montréal impresario François Mario Labbé.

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Duke Energy Corp

Duke Energy Corp is an integrated energy business involved in the transmission and distribution of NATURAL GAS and the generation and supply of electricity (see HYDROELECTRICITY). The company is headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, and has significant operations in Canada.

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Molson Coors Beverage Company

The Molson Coors Beverage Company (formerly Molson Coors Brewing Company) is a partly Canadian-owned enterprise and one of the world's largest beer makers. Its Canadian arm, Molson Coors Canada, is the successor to Molson Breweries, one of the country's oldest companies.

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Bank of Montreal (BMO)

The Bank of Montreal was founded in 1817, making it Canada’s oldest incorporated bank. From its founding to the creation of the Bank of Canada in 1935, the Bank of Montreal served as Canada’s central bank. Today, the various components of the Bank of Montreal are collectively known as BMO Financial Group. BMO is Canada’s fourth largest bank by assets, and the eighth largest in North America. It offers services in three distinct areas — personal and commercial banking, wealth management, and investment banking. BMO is a public company that trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol BMO. In 2021, BMO registered $27.19 billion in revenue and $7.75 billion in profit and held $988.18 billion in assets. BMO employs more than 43,863 people who serve more than 8 million customers across Canada.

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Economics

Economics involves the study of 3 interrelated issues: the allocation of RESOURCES used for the satisfaction of human wants; the INCOME DISTRIBUTION among individuals and groups; and the determination of the level of national output and employment.

Article

Canada Post Corporation

The CPC, under the Canada Post Corporation Act, has a broad mandate to operate a postal service for the transmission of messages, information, funds and goods and to provide other related services.

Macleans

Newcourt Credit

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 23, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Steven Hudson learned early about the power of performance-based compensation. As a teenager in Scarborough, Ont., he took a job at a bingo hall for seniors, pushing a refreshment cart up and down the aisles. The more chips and popcorn he sold, the more money he took home.

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Bank of Nova Scotia, Halifax

The Bank of Nova Scotia is located on Hollis Street across from Halifax's most iconic structure, Province House. Extremely sensitive to the location, Lyle felt it was important to echo some of the latter building's classical features.

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Sanofi Pasteur Limited

Sanofi Pasteur Limited, formerly known as Connaught Laboratories Limited of Toronto, is the leading supplier of vaccines in Canada. The parent company is Sanofi Pasteur, one of the world's largest manufacturers of vaccines and a division of Sanofi-aventis, a diversified pharmaceutical company.

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Debt in Canada

A debt is something that one owes to another. While debt can take many forms, the term usually refers to money owed. In a Canadian context, debts have become an increasing concern during the past three decades. According to Statistics Canada, at the end of the second quarter of 2020, Canadian non-financial businesses, governments and households owed almost $7.1 trillion in debts. That works out to roughly $186,000 per person. (See also Public Debt.)

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Nortel

Nortel Networks Corporation, or simply Nortel, was a public telecommunications and data networking equipment manufacturer. Founded in 1895 as the Northern Electric and Manufacturing Company, it was one of Canada’s oldest technology companies. Nortel expanded rapidly during the dot-com boom (1997–2001), purchasing many Internet technology companies in a drive to remain competitive in the expanding information technology (IT) market. At its height in 2000, the company represented over 35 per cent of the value of Toronto’s TSE 300 index. It was the ninth most valuable corporation in the world and employed about 94,000 people worldwide at its peak. But Nortel soon entered an extended and painful period of corporate downsizing, and in 2009, the company filed for bankruptcy protection in the largest corporate failure in Canadian history. Shareholders, employees and pensioners suffered losses as a result. Company executives, however, were paid a total US$190 million in retention bonuses between 2009 and 2016. Nortel sold off its assets for a total US$7.3 billion. Those assets were scheduled to be distributed to Nortel’s bondholders, suppliers and former employees in 2017.

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Canadian Foundations

Foundations are "non-governmental, non-profit organizations with funds (usually from a single source, either an individual, a family, or a corporation) and program managed by (their) own trustees or directors, established to maintain or aid social, educational, charitable, religious, or other activities serving the common welfare through the making of Grants".