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Davidee Mannumi

Davidee Mannumi, also known as Manumi "B", sculptor, (b Cape Dorset region, SW Baffin Island 9 Sept 1919; d there 1979). Mannumi immigrated to Iqaluit [Frobisher Bay] in the Dew Line construction period of the mid-1950s but later returned to Cape Dorset.

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Gloria George

Gloria Mary Maureen George, Indigenous politician, activist and public servant (born 24 July 1942 in Hubert, BC). A tireless advocate for non-status Indians, George was elected president of the Native Council of Canada in 1975, becoming the first and only woman to lead a major Indigenous political organization.

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Lee Cremo

Fiddler, composer, b Barra Head (now Chapel Island), Cape Breton, NS, 30 Dec 1938, d Eskasoni, NS, 10 Oct 1999. A Mi'kmaq person, Cremo was taken at four to Eskasoni, on the East Bay of Bras d'or Lake, Cape Breton.

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Alasua Amittuq Davidialuk

Alasua Amittuq Davidialuk, Inuk artist (b on a small island near Povungnituk, Qué c 1910; d on an emergency evacuation flight near Povungnituk 1 Aug 1976). An indifferent hunter, he lived in poverty until he gained recognition as a folk artist near mid-life.

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Peter Erasmus

Peter Erasmus, interpreter (b at Red River Colony [Man] 27 June 1833; d at Whitefish Lk, Alta 28 May 1931). Of Danish-Cree parentage, he studied to become an Anglican clergyman, but was drawn to the free life farther west.

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Jack Jacobs

Jack Jacobs, "Indian Jack," football player (born at Holdenville, OK, 1920; died at N Greensboro, NC 12 Jan 1974). A Muscogee (Creek) Indigenous person, Jacobs joined the National Football League from University of Oklahoma; playing mostly on defence, he was a sure-handed and solid tackler.

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Don Ense

Donald Orion Henry Ense, artist, illustrator, poet (b at Mindemoya, Manitoulin I, Ont 17 May 1953). An early member of the Manitoulin group of native painters, he found his theme in the teachings of the Anishabec (Ojibwa) and genre paintings of reserve life.

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Vancouver Asahi

The Asahi was a Japanese Canadian baseball club in Vancouver (1914–42). One of the city’s most dominant amateur teams, the Asahi used skill and tactics to win multiple league titles in Vancouver and along the Northwest Coast. In 1942, the team was disbanded when its members were among the 22,000 Japanese Canadians who were interned by the federal government (see Internment of Japanese Canadians). The Asahi were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003 and the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.

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David Helwig

David Gordon Helwig, author (born 5 April 1938 in Toronto, Ontario; died 16 October 2018 in Montague, PEI). David Helwig grew up in Toronto and at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont. He attended the University of Toronto, where he earned a BA, and then completed an MA at the University of Liverpool. First publishing as a poet, Helwig moved on to drama and fiction, including a series of novels focusing on characters living in Kingston, where Helwig lived for many years teaching at Queen's University. He was appointed Prince Edward Island's poet laureate in 2008 and was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2009.

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Haudenosaunee (Iroquois)

The Haudenosaunee, or “people of the longhouse,” commonly referred to as Iroquois or Six Nations, are members of a confederacy of Aboriginal nations known as the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. Originally a confederacy of five nations inhabiting the northern part of New York state, the Haudenosaunee consisted of the Seneca, Cayuga, Oneida, Onondaga and Mohawk. When the Tuscarora joined the confederacy early in the 18th century, it became known as the Six Nations. Today, Haudenosaunee live on well-populated reserves — known as reservations in the United States — as well as in off-reserve communities.

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Armenian Canadians

The present-day republic of Armenia was created in 1991 and includes only a small part of the territory that made up Ancient Armenia. Armenian migration to Canada began in the late 19th century. The 2016 census reported 63, 810 people of Armenian origin in Canada (34, 560 single and 29, 250 multiple responses).

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Brock Chisholm

George Brock Chisholm, CC, CBE, ED, psychiatrist, medical administrator, soldier (born 18 May 1896 in Oakville, ON; died 4 February 1971 in Victoria, BC). Brock Chisholm earned  honours for courageous service in the First World War, including a Military Cross (MC) and Bar. He obtained his MD from the University of Toronto in 1924 and became an influential psychiatrist following training at Yale University. He introduced mental health as a component of the recruitment and management of the Canadian Army during the Second World War. He directed the army’s medical services, served in the federal government as deputy minister of health, and became the founding director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO). His vocal attacks on methods of indoctrinating children with societal myths made him a controversial public figure. He was an often provocative advocate of world peace and mental health.

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10 Interesting Facts About Queen Elizabeth II

In 2022, Queen Elizabeth II celebrates her Platinum Jubilee, the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne. Over the course of her record-breaking reign, the Queen has witnessed unprecedented social, cultural and political change and travelled extensively throughout the United Kingdom, Canada and the wider Commonwealth. Here are 10 interesting facts about the long and eventful life and reign of Queen Elizabeth II.

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Faith Fyles

Faith Fyles, botanist, botanical artist (born 30 September 1875 in Cowansville, QC; died 22 October 1961 in Ottawa). Fyles was the first woman hired to the position of assistant botanist by the federal Department of Agriculture (now Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada). In 1919, she became the department’s first botanical artist, male or female.

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Métis Scrip in Canada

Scrip is any document used in place of legal tender, for example a certificate or voucher, where the bearer is entitled to certain rights. In 1870, the Canadian government devised a system of scrip — referred to as Métis scrip — that issued documents redeemable for land or money. Scrip was given to Métis people living in the West in exchange for their land rights. The scrip process was legally complex and disorganized; this made it difficult for Métis people to acquire land, yet simultaneously created room for fraud. In March 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the federal government failed to provide the Métis with the land grant they were promised in the Manitoba Act of 1870. Negotiations between various levels of government and the Métis Nation concerning the reclamation of land rights continue.

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Dionne Quintuplets

Annette, Emilie, Yvonne, Cecile and Marie aroused worldwide attention after their birth at Corbeil, Ontario, to Oliva and Elzire Dionne on 28 May 1934. With only two previous cases on record, they were the only quintuplets to survive for more than a few days. This miracle, plus their baby cuteness, the poverty of their French Canadian parents, and the controversy over their guardianship, made them the sensation of the 1930s.

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Royals Who Lived in Canada

There have been royal tours of Canada since the late 18th century, but some royalty stayed for longer than a few days or weeks and became property owners and/or long-term residents of Canada. Some lived in Canada on official business as military leaders or governors general, while others fled war, revolution or the paparazzi to find a safe haven. Here are 10 examples of royalty who lived in Canada.