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Camille Laurin (Obituary)

Camille Laurin once likened Bill 101, Quebec's landmark French language charter that he ushered into law, to shock therapy. It was a fitting analogy for Laurin, 76, a psychiatrist-turned-politician who died of cancer last week in Montreal.

Macleans

Nobel Prizes

Relations between the two men are cool, bordering on icy, as could be expected between leaders who represent opposite sides in the religious and political struggle that has bathed Northern Ireland in blood for three decades.

Macleans

Mike Bullard (Profile)

Outside John Brunton's office in the old Masonic Temple, workers are ripping out the guts of the historic downtown Toronto edifice, putting in lights and drop ceilings, toilets and showers and walls, transforming the storied concert venue into a state-of-the-art TV studio.

Macleans

Drabinsky-Livent Suits

Theatre impresario Garth Drabinsky hailed the April, 1998 arrival of a team of executives led by superagent Michael Ovitz as a blessing. Sure, it meant that Drabinsky and his longtime partner Myron Gottlieb would have to relinquish control of Livent Inc., their Toronto-based live theatre company.

Macleans

Betty Goodwin (Profile)

Betty Goodwin draws on the skin of things. She makes art with flattened shrouds of disembodied clothes, old vests pressed into paper like dried flowers. She stitches scars onto a black tarpaulin that hangs folded, with ropes dangling, like a stage curtain.

Article

The Bells

The Bells (The Five Bells 1965-70). Montreal-based pop group active predominantly 1965-73.

Article

Valerie Tryon

Valerie Tryon. Pianist, teacher, b Portsmouth, England, 5 Sep 1934, naturalized Canadian 1986; ARCM 1948, LRAM 1948, FRAM 1984, hon LWCM (Conservatory Canada) 1991, hon D LITT (McMaster) 2000.

Macleans

Newman Loses Co-hosting Job

As the clock wound down on a Good Morning America broadcast last week, co-host Kevin Newman was promoting highlights for the ABC network show the next day. One was an interview with a former host of the program who now anchors occasional specials for ABC.

Macleans

Drabinsky Charged

Garth Drabinsky tucked his head down and drove forward into the crush of microphone-waving reporters at a Toronto hotel. When he finally reached the podium, he bit his lower lip and then launched into a dramatic rebuke of a series of U.S.

Macleans

Ted Byfield (Profile)

In his heyday as founder and editor-in-chief of the feisty, ultra-conservative Alberta Report newsmagazine, Ted Byfield was famous for his newsroom rants and rages. As deadlines approached, he would pace the floor, railing at editors to get their copy in on time.

Macleans

Jack Webster (Obituary)

His voice bellowed like the lowest register of a Highland bagpipe, either engaging or irritating, depending on your point of view. His manner was gruff with anyone who dithered when answering his tough questions, yet gracious with ordinary people who sought his help.

Macleans

Jim Carrey (Profile)

For a while, it was easy to dismiss Jim Carrey. Sure, he became the first actor to crash the $20-million (U.S.) bracket for a single movie. And, yes, his work racked up more than half a billion dollars at the box office in just three years.

Macleans

Phyllis Gotlieb (Profile)

Phyllis GOTLIEB is the first to agree she fits the classic profile of the SCIENCE FICTION writer. "Like quite a few of us - Robert Silverberg, Frederik Pohl, my friend Judy Merril," she rhymes off, "I was an only child.

Macleans

Rodney Graham (Profile)

Rodney GRAHAM hunches over the desk in his modish Robson Street studio and taps compulsively on a calculator as if it were a musical keyboard. "I'm sorry I don't have any new work to show you," the Vancouver artist says politely. Graham, one of Canadian art's international stars, is playing hooky.