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Crown Point

Crown Point is a large peninsula strategically commanding the narrow passage of the southwestern portion of Lake CHAMPLAIN in upper New York State. It was initially the site of Fort Saint-Frédéric, built by the French in 1731 to defend French territory from English colonial invasion.

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Cumberland Sound

Cumberland Sound is a major inlet, 300 km long, with an average width of 65 km, in the east coast of BAFFIN ISLAND. Its steep sides rise over 2125 m to glacier-covered uplands.

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Devon Island

The Truelove Lowland area of the island has diverse vegetation and wildlife, an abundance of soil water in the summer owing to blocked drainage, and greater precipitation and higher summer temperatures (4° to 8°C), with more clear days than other parts of the island.

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Cree Lake

Cree Lake, 1435 km2, elevation 487 m, max length 81 km, max width 57 km, located in northern Saskatchewan west of Reindeer Lake and S of Lake Athabasca, is the fourth-largest lake in Saskatchewan.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Continental Divides in Canada

A continental divide is a ridge or natural boundary of elevated terrain that separates the drainage basins of a continent. Each drainage basin contributes its water to river systems, which in turn flow into distinct larger bodies of water, such as oceans. The main continental divide in Canada follows the ridge of the Rocky Mountains.

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Cordillera

A cordillera is a major system of often parallel mountain ranges that includes the intervening plateaus, valleys and plains.

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Lake Diefenbaker

Lake Diefenbaker is a reservoir lake south of Saskatoon, Sask. It was formed by the construction of 2 dams that created a widening in the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER as part of the South Saskatchewan River Development Project, inaugurated in 1958.

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Delta (Landform)

​A delta is a deposit of sediment at the mouth of a river that accumulates as the river flows into a standing body of water such as a lake or ocean. Because sediment tends to be rich in nutrients, deltas become fertile wetlands inhabited by diverse wildlife. Among the largest deltas in Canada are those of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan rivers, as well as the Peace-Athabasca Delta (where the Peace, Athabasca and Birch rivers meet). Certain deltas offer advantageous access to natural resources and maritime transportation, but development projects are often controversial due to the ecological importance of these environments.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

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Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

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Dubawnt River

Dubawnt River, 842 km long, rises from a web of lakes in the Northwest Territories, 120 km northeast of Lake Athabasca

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Eagle Pass

Eagle Pass, elevation about 550 m, provides a corridor through the Gold Range in the Monashee Mountains between Shuswap Lake and the ​Columbia River, 12 km southwest of ​Revelstoke, British Columbia.

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Dartmouth Lakes

The Dartmouth Lakes are 25 separate lakes located within the city of Dartmouth, NS, across the harbour from Halifax. Formed by Pleistocene glaciation about 15 000 years ago, they range in area from 1 to 140 ha.

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Churchill Falls

The project was undertaken by a subsidiary of British Newfoundland Corp Ltd (Brinco), and was at the time the largest civil engineering project ever undertaken in North America. Eighty strategically placed dikes pooled the vast waters of the Labrador Plateau in the Smallwood Reservoir.

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Chaleur Bay

Chaleur Bay, which lies between the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec, and northern New Brunswick, is the largest bay in the Gulf of St Lawrence. At its entrance lies Miscou Island.

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Cormorant Island

Cormorant Island is a small, wooded island fringed with rock beaches close to the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. ALERT BAY, a fishing port and commercial centre for nearby logging communities, is located on its south shore. The island boasts some of the finest TOTEM POLES on the BC coast.

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Cornwall Island

Cornwall Island, 2258 km2, located in the northern ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO, some 100 km W of Ellesmere I. It is generally low, rising to a 375 m summit towards the W. The island was discovered in 1852 by Sir Edward BELCHER and named North Cornwall.

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Île aux Coudres

Île aux Coudres, 30 km 2 , 11 km long, 4.3 km wide, 92 m high, is situated 60 km downstream from Québec City in the ST LAWRENCE RIVER estuary. The island consists of 2 Appalachian ridges joined by an embankment.