Search for "liberal"

Displaying 101-120 of 359 results
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Bennett Campbell

William Bennett Campbell, teacher, politician, premier of PEI (born 27 Aug 1943 in Montague, PEI; died 11 September 2008 in Cardigan, PEI). Campbell succeeded Alexander Campbell (no relation) as leader of the Liberal Party and premier of the province in 1978, but his caretaker government was defeated by the PCs in the 1979 election.

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John Harvard

John Harvard, journalist, politician, lieutenant-governor of MANITOBA (b at Glenboro, Man, 4 June 1938). Harvard grew up in Glenboro and pursued a career in journalism following graduation.

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Grant MacEwan

John Walter Grant MacEwan, author, historian, ​lieutenant-governor of ​Alberta (born in ​Brandon, ​Manitoba on 12 August 1902; died in ​Calgary, Alberta on 15 June 2000).

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Catherine Callbeck

In 1988 she returned to politics, this time at the federal level, winning the PEI riding of Malpeque for the Liberals. Following the resignation of PEI premier Joe Ghiz, Callbeck announced she wished to succeed him.

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Daniel John O'Donoghue

Daniel John O'Donoghue, printer, trade union leader, politician (b at Lakes of Killarney, Ire 1844; d at Toronto 16 Jan 1907). "The father of the Canadian labor movement" began his apprenticeship as a printer in Ottawa

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David Laird

David Laird, editor, politician, lieutenant-governor, Indian commissioner (b New Glasgow, PEI 12 Mar 1833; d at Ottawa 12 Jan 1914).

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Charles Woodward

Charles Woodward, merchant, politician (b in Wentworth County, Canada W 19 July 1842; d at Vancouver 2 June 1937). After failing as a farmer and having mixed success as a merchant on Manitoulin Island and at Thessalon, Ont, Woodward decided that Vancouver offered better opportunities.

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Daniel Paillé

Daniel Paillé, leader of the Bloc Québécois, federal and provincial politician, administrator, economist, university professor (born 1 April 1950 in Montréal); BAA (HEC Montréal) 1974, MSc (UQAM) 1976.

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Angus Lewis Macdonald

Victorious in the election of 1933 during the Great Depression, Macdonald implemented old-age pensions and relief for the unemployed, and launched an inquiry (Jones Commission) into the effects of the tariff on the NS economy.

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Alphonse-Télesphore Lépine

Alphonse-Télesphore Lépine, printer, politician and union activist (born 15 May 1855 in Quebec City, QC; died 19 August 1943 in Montreal, QC). Elected in a by-election in the riding of Montreal East in 1888, he became the first working-class independent member of parliament in the House of Commons. In the House, he promoted a program inspired by the Knights of Labor’s declaration of principles. Throughout Lépine’s political career, his supporters did not hesitate to capitalize on his working-class background and were quick to describe him as a true “self-made man” who owed his success to his love of work.

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David Dingwall (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 3, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Forget, for a moment, his reputation as a throwback to the old-style, intensely partisan Ottawa wheeler-dealers. At a little past 8 a.m. on a steel-grey morning, David Dingwall is trying to lighten up. It does not come easily.

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Jean J. Charest

Jean J. Charest, lawyer, politician, premier of Québec from 2003 to 2012 (born at Sherbrooke, Qué, 24 June 1958). Charest received both his undergraduate degree and a degree in law at Sherbrooke University. He was first elected as Member of Parliament for Sherbrooke in 1984.

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Daniel Williams

In addition to practising law, Williams excelled at business. While attending Dalhousie's law school, he led a group of businesspeople to seek the first cable licence in Newfoundland and built Cable Atlantic into one of the largest communications companies in Atlantic Canada.

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William Lyon Mackenzie King

William Lyon Mackenzie King, prime minister of Canada 1921–26, 1926–30 and 1935–48 (born 17 December 1874 in Berlin [Kitchener], ON; died 22 July 1950 in Kingsmere, QC). William Lyon Mackenzie King was the dominant political figure in an era of major changes. He was leader of the Liberal Party from 1919 to 1948, and Prime Minister of Canada for almost 22 of those years. King was Canada’s longest-serving prime minister. He steered Canada through industrialization, much of the Great Depression, and the Second World War. By the time he left office, Canada had achieved greater independence from Britain and a stronger international voice. It had also implemented policies such as employment insurance.