Search for "Beauport"

Displaying 1-20 of 38 results
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Beauport

In 1634, Robert Giffard received the seigneury of Beauport from the Compagnie des cent associés. In 1698, 444 French colonists settled just east of Rivière Beauport, attracted by the flour mill and agricultural land.

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Lac-Beauport

In the early 1800s the territory was opened up to exploit the forest resources. By the early 1820s the area around Lac Beauport was known as Waterloo Settlement. The first settlers were of English origin. In 1853 the parish municipality of Saint-Dunstan-du-Lac-Beauport was created.

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Joseph-Désiré Marcoux

Joseph-Désiré. Marcoux Clarinetist, farmer, b Beauport, near Quebec City, 20 May 1850, d St-Prime, Lac St-Jean, Que, 5 Feb 1888. He taught himself music and took part in all the musical soirées in the Beauport region.

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Charlesbourg

The first settlement of Charlesbourg dates back to the 1660s when the Jesuits organized the nucleus of a colony in a place known as the Trait-Carré, meaning "perpendicular." The name Charlesbourg originates from this time from a chapel built at Bourg-Royal, in honour of St Charles Borromée.

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Montmorency

The Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick HALDIMAND, governor general in chief of Canada, was inhabited 1791-94 by the duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria. First known as the "Kent House," it suffered a devastating fire in 1993 but was rebuilt by the following year.

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Claire Martin

Claire Martin, pseudonym of Claire Montreuil (b at Québec C 18 Apr 1914). She studied with the Ursulines (in Québec City) and the Dames de la Congrégation (in BEAUPORT). She won the Prix du Cercle du livre de France (1958) for her first book, a collection of short stories called Avec ou sans amour.

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Henri-Raymond Casgrain

Henri-Raymond Casgrain, historian, literary critic (b at Rivière-Ouelle, Qué, 16 Dec 1831; d at Québec City, 12 Jan 1904). Casgrain was ordained a priest in 1856. After teaching at his former college, Ste-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, he was named vicar at BEAUPORT and then at Notre-Dame de Québec.

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Joseph Vézina

Joseph Vézina, conductor, organist, choirmaster, teacher, composer, music dealer, publisher (b at Québec City 11 Jun 1849; d there 5 Oct 1924).

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Herman Witsius Ryland

Herman Witsius Ryland, officeholder (b at Warwick or at Northampton, Eng 1759(?); d at Beauport, LC 20 July 1838). He arrived in Lower Canada in 1793 as civil secretary under Lord DORCHESTER and was secretary to Dorchester's successors until 1813.

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Battle of the Plains of Abraham

The Battle of the Plains of Abraham (13 September 1759), also known as the Battle of Quebec, was a pivotal moment in the Seven Years’ War and in the history of Canada. A British invasion force led by General James Wolfe defeated French troops under the Marquis de Montcalm, leading to the surrender of Quebec to the British. Both commanding officers died from wounds sustained during the battle. The French never recaptured Quebec and effectively lost control of New France in 1760. At the end of the war in 1763 France surrendered many of its colonial possessions — including Canada — to the British.

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Léa Roback

​Léa Roback, CQ, bookseller, trade union activist, feminist and pacifist (born 3 November 1903 in Montréal, Québec; died 28 August 2000 in Montréal).

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Joseph Vézina

(François) Joseph Vézina. Bandmaster, organist, choirmaster, teacher, composer, music dealer, publisher, b Quebec City 11 Jun 1849, d there 5 Oct 1924; honorary D MUS (Laval) 1922. He was educated at the École St-Jean-Baptiste and the Séminaire de Québec.

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Manon Rhéaume

Manon Rhéaume, hockey player (born 24 February 1972 in Lac-Beauport, Québec). Goaltender Manon Rhéaume was a pioneer in women’s hockey. In 1992, she became the first woman to try out for a National Hockey League (NHL) team and to play in an NHL game. In doing so, she also became the first woman to play in any of North America’s major sports leagues. Rhéaume also represented Canada in international women’s hockey. She was part of the World Championship women’s team in 1992 and 1994, and helped Team Canada win the Olympic silver medal in 1998, the first year that women’s hockey was included in the Olympic Winter Games.

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Claude Lavoie

Claude Lavoie. Organist, teacher, composer, b Rivière-du-Loup, Que, 19 Jul 1918. He began studying piano and organ in 1933 at the Collège de Lévis with Father Alphonse Tardif. A winner in 1942 of the Prix d'Europe, he studied 1942-5 at the Longy School in Boston with Nadia Boulanger, E.

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Roland Lebrun

Roland ('Le soldat Lebrun') Lebrun. Singer, songwriter, b Amqui, Que, 10 Oct 1919, d Quebec City 2 Jan 1980. The popularity enjoyed by this country singer was limited mainly to the years of World War II. He joined the Canadian army in 1939 but spent the war in the camp at Valcartier, Que.

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Melvin Charney

Charney's first independent project was a school built at Lac Beauport, Qué, in 1964. In 1970 his proposal for the Canadian pavilion for the Osaka World Fair, although not selected, received wide acclaim.

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James Murray

His willingness to allow French law and custom in the courts further alienated the merchants and led to his recall in April 1766 and he left Canada in June. Though charges were dismissed, he did not return to Canada though he retained nominal governorship until April 1768.