Search for "Charlottetown Accord"

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Charlottetown

Charlottetown, PEI, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 36,094 (2016 c), 34,562 (2011 c). The capital of Prince Edward Island, the City of Charlottetown is also the administrative centre of Queens County and the principal municipality of Canada's smallest province. It is situated on a broad harbour opening into the Northumberland Strait. Three rivers converge there, with the city located on a low-rising point of land between the Hillsborough (East) and North (Yorke) rivers just opposite the harbour's mouth. Suburban development has spread across the Hillsborough to Stratford, and between the North and West (Eliot) rivers at Cornwall. Besides its governmental functions, Charlottetown services a considerable agricultural hinterland and is the focus of Island communications. Its favourable climate, nearby beaches and claim to be the “Birthplace of Confederation” have made it a major tourist centre.

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Cornwall (PEI)

Cornwall, PEI, incorporated as a town in 1995, population 5162 (2011c), 4677 (2006c). The Town of Cornwall is located 6 kilometres west of CHARLOTTETOWN. Named after the Duchy of Cornwall in England, the community was originally

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Cardigan

Cardigan, PEI, incorporated as a village in 1954 and as a community in 1983, population 332 (2011c), 374 (2006c). The Community of Cardigan is situated 54 km northeast of CHARLOTTETOWN. A fishing and farming community and the

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Kensington

Owing to its crossroads location, the town received a station when the PEI Railway was constructed in 1873. Today Kensington is still a commercial centre, although it competes with the larger port town of Summerside.

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Cavendish

 Established in 1790 by Scottish immigrants, Cavendish was originally a farming community. With the 1930s' establishment of the national park, TOURISM has become the community's principal employer. It was in Cavendish that novelist and native Lucy Maud MONTGOMERY wrote ANNE OF GREEN GABLES.

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Nova Scotia and Confederation

Nova Scotia was one of the four founding provinces of Canada. It joined New Brunswick,  Ontario and Quebec in Confederation on 1 July 1867. However, this was mainly because Confederation delivered the Intercolonial Railway to the Maritimes, and because of the efforts of Sir Charles Tupper. His government passed approval for Confederation in the colonial legislature despite popular opposition. (See Confederation’s Opponents.) Confederation was met with mass protests in the colony. Joseph Howe led a two-year effort to repeal the union. (See Repeal Movement.) But Howe finally decided he could do more to help his province by working inside the federal government. He joined the federal Cabinet in 1869.

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New Brunswick and Confederation

New Brunswick became one of the founding members of the Dominion of Canada on 1 July 1867 when it joined Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec in Confederation. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, the lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, helped organize the Charlottetown Conference (1–9 September 1864), where a federal union of British North American colonies was first discussed. By 1865, however, a majority in the New Brunswick legislature had swung against it. Albert Smith defeated pro-Confederation premier Samuel Tilley in a snap election that year. But the Fenian Raids in 1866 fueled New Brunswick’s sense of insecurity and increased support for Confederation. After Tilley’s party won another election in 1866, the legislature voted 38–1 in favour of Confederation.

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St Peters Bay

St Peters Bay, PEI, incorporated as a village in 1953 and as a community in 1983, population 253 (2011c), 248 (2006c). The Community of St Peters Bay, 53 km northeast of Charlottetown, is located at the head of a bay of the same

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Tignish

Today, Tignish is 93% Roman Catholic and more than 20% of the population can speak both French and English. The co-operative movement has been one of the community's most distinctive features.

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Alberton

By 1833 Alberton was known as "Stump Town" because hundreds of stumps were left after the clearing of a forest. Owing to its crossroads location, Alberton was later known as the "Cross." On 27 June 1862, the community was renamed in honour of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales.

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Montague

While it still lacks an industrial base, the town has experienced renewed prosperity with the agricultural revitalization that began in the 1960s. Out-of-province investment established tobacco farms and rejuvenated the mixed- and dairy-farming industries.

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Souris (PEI)

Today Souris remains one of the province's main ports; its harbour is not only the site of the Îles de la Madeleine ferry terminal, but it has the only offshore fishing fleet on PEI. It is also noted for its lobster industry and fine beach on NORTHUMBERLAND STRAIT.

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Borden-Carleton

Borden-Carleton, PEI, incorporated as a community in 1983, population 750 (2011c), 786 (2006c). The Community of Borden-Carleton was created in 1995 with the amalgamation of the town of Borden (incorporated in 1919) and the

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Summerside

Beginning around 1910, the town experienced renewed prosperity as a fur-trading centre, stimulated by Sir Charles Dalton and Robert T. Oulton's successful breeding of silver foxes in captivity. In 1920 Summerside was established as the headquarters of the Canadian National Silver Fox Breeders' Assn.

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Capital Cities

Capital cities are the designated centres of formal political power and administrative authority in their respective territories.

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Newfoundland and Labrador and Confederation

Attempts to bring Newfoundland into Confederation in the 1860s and 1890s were met with lukewarm interest in the colony. In 1934, Newfoundland was in bankruptcy during the Great Depression. It suspended responsible government and accepted an unelected Commission Government directed by Britain. In a 1948 referendum, Newfoundlanders were given the choice to either continue with the Commission Government, join Canada, or seek a return to responsible government as an independent dominion. The independence option won the first vote. But the Confederation option won a run-off vote with 52.3 per cent support. The British and Canadian parliaments approved of the union. Newfoundland became Canada’s 10th province on 31 March 1949. In 2001, the province’s name was officially changed to Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Klondike

Klondike (also spelled Klondyke). The name is derived from a Gwich'in word, thron-duick (hammer river), and identifies a town, a river, and a range of hills in the Yukon.

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Canada West

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) laid out the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union in 1840. The Province of Canada was made up of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada). The two regions were governed jointly until Confederation in 1867. Canada West then became Ontario and Canada East became Quebec.

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British Columbia and Confederation

The colony of British Columbia was founded in 1858 in response to the Fraser River Gold Rush. (See also The Fraser River Gold Rush and the Founding of British Columbia.) The colony established representative government in 1864 and merged with the colony of Vancouver Island in 1866. In May 1868, Amor De Cosmos formed the Confederation League to bring responsible government to BC and to join Confederation. In September 1868, the Confederation League passed 37 resolutions outlining the terms for a union with the Dominion of Canada. The terms were passed by both the BC assembly and the federal Parliament in 1871. The colony joined Canada as the country’s sixth province on 20 July 1871. The threat of American annexation, embodied by the Alaska purchase of 1867, and the promise of a railway linking BC to the rest of Canada, were decisive factors.

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