Search for "Jesuits"

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Collège des Jésuites

An estimated 1700 students attended the Collège des Jésuites, more than half of them being students from the Petit Séminaire. These pupils were drawn much more from the Québec than from the Montréal region. Louis JOLLIET is one of the most famous alumni of the college.

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Saint Mary's University

Saint Mary's University, Halifax, was founded in 1802 to provide higher learning to young Catholic men. It is the oldest English-speaking, Roman-Catholic university in Canada. The Nova Scotia House of Assembly granted Saint Mary's its charter in 1841.

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Concordia University

Founded in 1974 as a result of the merger of Sir George Williams University and Loyola College, Concordia is a public university in Québec with two campuses: one in downtown Montréal and the other in the city’s west end. The language of instruction at this comprehensive institution is English. It is the second largest anglophone university in Québec, after McGill University.

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Private School

Fee-supported educational institutions at the primary and secondary level not under direct government control have existed in Canada from the earliest years of white settlement to the present day. Until the 1830s, most schooling was private.

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Education of Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Before contact with Europeans, Indigenous peoples educated their youth through traditional means — demonstration, group socialization, participation in cultural and spiritual rituals, skill development and oral teachings. The introduction of European classroom-style education as part of a larger goal of assimilation disrupted traditional methods and resulted in cultural trauma and dislocation. Reformers of Indigenous education policies are attempting to reintegrate traditional teachings and provide more cultural and language-based support to enhance and improve the outcomes of Indigenous children in the education system.

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Curriculum Development

Curriculum development in Canada has gone from teaching survival skills, both practical and cultural, to emphasizing self-fulfillment and standards-based achievements. This evolution mirrors that which has occurred in other developed countries, namely in Europe.

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Manitoba Schools Question

The struggle over the rights of francophones in Manitoba to receive an education in their mother tongue and their religion is regarded as one of the most important “school crises” in Canadian history, with major short-term and long-term consequences.