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Macleans

Ontario Hydro Meltdown

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 25, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

Carl Andognini gives his diamond pinky ring a fiddle and offers a thin smile. A very thin smile. He has just come from yet another meeting with a crowd of ONTARIO HYDRO staffers in the mega-corporation’s mirrored headquarters in downtown Toronto.

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Geography of Ontario

Ontario is divided by three of Canada’s seven physiographic regions. These three regions are the Hudson Bay Lowlands, the Canadian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands. Agriculture, as well as most of the population, is concentrated in the south. Despite the tendency to divide the province into three regions, there are distinct areas within these broad classifications. Geology, climate, soil and vegetation combine to create these distinct areas.

Macleans

Ontario Cuts Back

Inside the former supermarket warehouse that houses the Daily Bread Food Bank on Toronto's Lakeshore Boulevard, assistant executive director Sue Cox stared in grim disbelief at the people trickling by her office for welfare counselling. "I know there's a financial crisis," she said.

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Royal Ontario Museum

The Royal Ontario Museum owes its existence in large part to the vision of two remarkable men. The first, Charles Trick Currelly (1876-1957), was born at Exeter Ontario and originally trained as a Methodist minister at the University of Toronto.

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Order of Ontario

The Order of Ontario was created in 1986 to "recognize Ontario residents who have achieved the highest level of individual excellence and achievement in any field." Anyone who is a resident or former long-term resident of Ontario is eligible to be nominated.

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Reserves in Ontario

There are 207 reserves in Ontario, held by 123 First Nations. In 2019, there were 218,451 registered Indians living in Ontario, 44 per cent of whom lived on reserves. Reserves in Ontario are held by Anishinaabe, Cree, Oji-Cree, Haudenosaunee, Delaware and Algonquin peoples. There are also a handful of First Nations in Ontario who, for a variety of reasons, do not have reserve land.

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Politics in Ontario

The province of Ontario has a majority Progressive Conservative government, formed on 2 June 2022. The premier of the province is Doug Ford and the lieutenant-governor is Elizabeth Dowdeswell. Its first premier, John Sandfield Macdonald, began his term in 1867, after the province joined Confederation. Between the start of European colonization and Confederation, the southern portion of what is now Ontario was controlled first by the French and then by the British, while much of the northern part was controlled by the Hudson’s Bay Company. Ontario (Upper Canada) received representative government in 1791, from which time the colony was governed by a House of Assembly, a lieutenant-governor, and executive and legislative councils. In 1848, Ontario (Canada West) received responsible government. From this point the colony was governed by a House of Assembly, premier, and executive and legislative councils.

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University of Guelph

The University of Guelph, in GUELPH, Ontario, was incorporated in 1964. Its history dates back to 1874 when the Ontario School of Agriculture was established on a farm provided by the Ontario government. In 1880 it became the Ontario Agricultural College.

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Robert Dickson

Robert Dickson, poet, translator (born 23 July 1944 in Toronto, Ontario; died 19 March 2007 in Sudbury, Ontario). This Franco-Ontarian poet contributed greatly to the artistic renaissance of French-speaking Ontario in the 1970s.

Macleans

Ontario Implements Tax Break

It was perhaps ironic that Ontario's controversial Conservative government could not even cut taxes without sparking an agonized debate. Eleven months after Premier Mike Harris swept to power, he fulfilled a key election promise in last week's budget, introducing the first stages of a 30.

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Women's Suffrage in Ontario

Ontario became the fifth province to grant women the right to vote on 12 April 1917, after more than half a century of activism by suffragists. Beginning in the 1870s, Ontario’s suffrage movement emerged from the vibrant nation-wide mobilization of middle class women who sought political representation as a means to improve women’s rights and assert influence in social, economic and political reform.