Search for "black history"

Displaying 1-20 of 80 results
Article

Little Burgundy and Montreal's Black English-Speaking Community

Little Burgundy is a neighbourhood in the southwest borough of Montreal, Quebec. It is the historical home of the city’s Black English-speaking, working-class community (see also Black Canadians). Montreal's early Black settlement was comprised mainly of African Americans who lived in the Faubourg (French for "suburb") of St. Antoine — a neighbourhood that is now known as Little Burgundy. The settlement dates to the emergence of the railway companies in the mid- to late 19th century and the era of the Black sleeping car porters.

Article

Coffee houses

Cafés that presented folk, blues and, occasionally, pop and jazz musicians. Like the boîte à chansons that was unique to French Canada, the coffee house - often in a converted house, a storefront or a church basement - was characterized by its limited seating capacity (an average of less than 100), informality, and intimacy

Article

The Crest Theatre

The Crest Theatre was founded in 1953 by Donald and Murray DAVIS with the support of their sister, Barbara CHILCOTT. As students, in the late 1940s, Donald and Murray had studied theatre under Robert Gill at the University of Toronto's Hart House Theatre.

Article

The Rooms

The Rooms is a cultural centre located in St. John’s, Newfoundland, that showcases the history, heritage and art of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Article

Belfry Theatre

The Belfry's history began in 1974, when University of Victoria graduate student Blair Shakel started making theatrical use of the unheated Springridge Chapel of the Emmanuel Baptist Church in the heart of the ailing Fernwood neighbourhood.

Article

McCord Museum

The McCord Museum houses the most extensive First Nations collection of its kind in Québec, the largest costume collection in Canada and the unique NOTMAN Photographic Archives. McCord's diversified collections include the history of Canada, Québec, and especially of Montréal.

Article

Kensington Market

Kensington Market is an open-air food and clothing market in downtown Toronto. This multicultural marketplace is known for its independent spirit, colourful shop fronts, vibrant murals, charismatic locals and people-friendly Pedestrian Sundays events. The eclectic businesses located here sell fresh produce, cheese, meats, bread and desserts, bulk spices, nuts, flowers, marijuana and vintage clothing. The area also teems with a variety of restaurants, cafés and bars. The shops in Kensington Market spill out onto the sidewalk, giving the area a vibrant street culture unique to the city of Toronto. It is bordered by Spadina Avenue in the east, Bathurst Street in the west, Dundas Street in the south and College Street in the north.

Article

Eglinton Theatre

The Eglinton Theatre, designed for cinema by Kaplan & Sprachman, architects, Toronto (1935-36), is one of the fullest interpretations of Art Deco styling in the mid-1930s in Canada.

Editorial

Vancouver Feature: Little Tramp Graces the Orpheum Stage

When a troupe of English Music Hall entertainers swept through Vancouver in 1911, the star was an acrobatic little comedian who would soon become one of the most famous people in the world: Charlie Chaplin. Another player would carve his own niche in entertainment history, too. Arthur Stanley Jefferson became a beloved star after he changed his name to Stan Laurel and teamed up on film with Oliver Hardy.

Article

Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company

The Vancouver Playhouse adopted the standard program pattern for regional theatres in Canada - a September to May season of about 6 plays that were mainly recent London and Broadway successes with a few classics included. From as early as 1966, every season featured at least one Canadian play.

Article

Music in Fredericton

Fredericton, NB. New Brunswick's capital city, located on the Saint John River on the site of a 1732 Acadian, and later Loyalist English, settlement at St Anne's Point. The name Fredericton was adopted in 1785. Incorporation as a city was accomplished in 1848.

Article

Festival Theatre

The term "festival theatre" emerged in England in the nineteenth century to refer to special theatrical performances mounted to celebrate exceptional authors or dates. The festival held in 1864 at Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, to mark the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth is an early example.

Article

Rainbow Stage

Rainbow Stage, named for its rainbow-shaped proscenium arch, opened with a variety show directed by Duncan on 7 July 1954. In September 1955 Duncan directed the first musical comedy performed there, Brigadoon, which marked the beginning of a tradition.

Article

Music at Bishop's University

Bishop's University. Founded in 1843 in Lennoxville, near Sherbrooke, Que, by George Jehoshaphat Mountain, the third Anglican bishop of Quebec, as a liberal arts college. Its foundation was ratified by an act of the Quebec Legislative Assembly.

Article

Music in Guelph

Guelph, Ont. Founded 1827 by John Galt in the heart of agricultural Ontario and incorporated in 1879. In 1846 there were 1240 people living in Guelph. By 1988 the population had reached 80,786 including a large Italian.community.