Search for "black history"

Displaying 1-20 of 130 results
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Milos Mladenovic

Milos Mladenovic, professor, editor (b S of Belgrade, Serbia 1903; d at Montréal 4 Oct 1984). With degrees in law and commerce from Belgrade and a doctorate from the Sorbonne, he joined McGill's history department in June 1950.

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Alfred Schmitz Shadd

Alfred Schmitz Shadd, educator, physician, farmer, politician, pharmacist, editor, civic leader (born 1870 in Raleigh Township, Kent County, ON; died 1915 in Winnipeg, MB).

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Olivier Le Jeune

We may never know the exact number of British ships that carried enslaved people from the continent of Africa to the New World (see Black Enslavement in Canada). However, the earliest record of enslaved Black Africans in New France is the sale of a boy from either Madagascar or Guinea. In 1629, the child, believed to have been around six years old, was brought to New France aboard a British ship as the chattel slave of Sir David Kirke, a trader and privateer for England’s King Charles I. The boy was later sold to a French clerk named Olivier Le Baillif (sometimes referred to as Olivier Le Tardiff), and then transferred to Guillaume Couillard. In 1633, the enslaved boy was baptized and given the name Olivier Le Jeune. Le Jeune remained in the colony of New France for the rest of his life.

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Black Enslavement in Canada (Plain-Language Summary)

The practice of slavery was introduced by colonists in New France in the early 1600s. The practice was continued after the British took control of New France in 1760 (see British North America.) For about two hundred years, thousands of Indigenous and Black African people were bought, sold, traded and inherited like property in early Canada. Slavery was abolished (made illegal) throughout British North America in 1834.

(This article is a plain-language summary of slavery in Canada. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry on Black Enslavement in Canada.)

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The Underground Railroad (Plain-Language Summary)

The Underground Railroad was a secret organization. It was made up of people who helped African Americans escape from slavery in the southern United States. The people in this organization set up a system of routes that escaped slaves could travel to find freedom in the northern United States and Canada. In the 1800s (the 19th century) between 30,000 and 40,000 escaped slaves traveled to British North America (Canada) through the Underground Railroad.

(This article is a plain-language summary of the Underground Railroad in Canada. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry on The Underground Railroad.)

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Irène Brisson

Irène Brisson (b Jourinn). Teacher, musicologist, broadcaster, b Paris 20 Jan 1946, naturalized Canadian 1975; premier prix history (Paris Cons) 1969, premier prix musicology (Paris Cons) 1971.

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Armando Santiago

Santiago, Armando. Composer, conductor, teacher, administrator, b Lisbon 18 Jun 1932, naturalized Canadian 1972; premier prix music history (Lisbon Cons) 1954, premier prix composition (Lisbon Cons) 1960.

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Nicole Labelle

Nicole Labelle. Musicologist, teacher, pianist, organist, b Montreal 2 Jun 1946; B MUS (Montreal) 1967, M MUS (Montreal) 1970, premier prix history (CMM) 1973, D MUS (Sorbonne) 1978.

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James De Mille

James De Mille, professor, novelist (b at Saint John 23 Aug 1833; d at Halifax 28 Jan 1880). He spent most of his life teaching history, rhetoric and literature at Dalhousie in Halifax.

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Robert Rumilly

Robert Rumilly, nationalist historian (b in Martinique 1897; d at Montréal 8 Mar 1983). In an amazing series of 42 volumes, Rumilly set forth the history of Québec from 1867 to the present.

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Jack Granatstein

The most prolific Canadian historian of his generation, Granatstein has written widely on Canadian history and current affairs. His journalism, polemics, and academic writings are all characterized by lucid prose and an iconoclastic tone.

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Frederic Hubert Soward

Frederic Hubert Soward, historian, educator (b at Minden, Ont 10 Apr 1899; d at Vancouver 1 Jan 1985). Educated at Toronto, Edinburgh and Oxford, he taught history at UBC 1922-64 (head of department, 1953-63).

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John Godfrey

John Ferguson Godfrey, academic, editor, politician (b at Toronto 19 Dec 1942). A surprising choice to become editor of the Financial Post in 1987, Godfrey was educated at University of Toronto and Oxford, where he studied French history.

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Charlotte Gray

Charlotte Gray, historian (born in England). Prior to immigrating to Canada from England in 1979, Charlotte Gray attended Oxford University, earning a BA in modern history and later pursuing post-graduate work at the London School of Economics.

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Gifford Mitchell

Gifford (Jerome) Mitchell. Educator, organist, choir director, b Cobden, Renfrew County, Ont, 29 Apr 1913, d 3 Dec 2006; BA (McGill) 1934, B MUS (Toronto) 1948. He taught history and languages in Westmount, Que, after graduating from McGill University.

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Gregory Levin

Levin, Gregory (John). Composer, teacher, pianist, conductor, b Washington, DC, 8 Mar 1943, naturalized Canadian 1989; BA (Harvard) 1967, MFA (Brandeis) 1969, PH D (Brandeis) 1975.

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Fernand Ouellet

Fernand Ouellet, historian, educator (b at Lac Bouchette, Qué 6 Nov 1926). After taking his doctorate from Université de Laval, Ouellet did specialized study in Paris, returning to teach history at Laval, then at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and, finally, York University in Toronto.