Search for "indigenous families system"

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Flatfish

Flatfish is the common name for fish belonging to the order Pleuronectiformes. There are 14 families of flatfish and over 800 species worldwide. In Canadian waters there are approximately 39 species of flatfish, from five families. These families are Pleuronectidae, Bothidae, Paralichthyidae, Scophthalmidae and Cynoglossidae. Familiar flatfishes found in Canada include halibut, plaice, flounder and turbot. Among their distinguishing features, flatfish have both eyes on one side of their body.

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Carnivora

Carnivora is an order of flesh-eating mammals, which includes terrestrial and aquatic families.

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Bluebell

Bluebell, common name for several plants with bell-shaped flowers of Campanulaceae and Boraginaceae families.

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Fish Classification

The classification of fishes has undergone much change over the last few decades, and further changes are expected, partly because so many groups are poorly known.

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Hawk

Hawk is a common name for several species of diurnal birds of prey from widely separate families.

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Swift

Swift is a common name for about 100 species of birds in 2 closely related families (Apodidae, Hemiprocnidae).

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Insectivora

Insectivora, order of mammals containing 7 living families: shrews, moles, hedgehogs, tenrecs, otter shrews, golden moles and solenodons.

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Grosbeak

Grosbeak is a common name for large members of 2 families of birds, Cardinalidae (cardinal) and Fringillidae (finch).

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Lagomorpha

Lagomorpha, order of mammals containing 2 families: the rabbits and hares (Leporidae), and the small, lesser-known pikas (Ochotonidae).

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Whelk

Whelkis the common name for a carnivorous marine snail which may be included with the Buccinid, Muricid or Purpurid families.

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Sparrow

Sparrow is the name given to several unrelated groups of birds. Sparrows are classified in 3 families: Emberizidae, Estrildidae, and Passeridae.

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Bass

Bass, name applied to members of 4 fish families: temperate bass (Moronidae); sunfish (Centrarchidae); temperate ocean bass (Acropomatidae); and sea bass (Serranidae).

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Lacewing

Lacewing is the common name for small, fragile insects of the 2 most common families (Chrysopidae, green lacewings; Hemerobiidae, brown lacewings) of order Neuroptera.

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Reserves in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is home to at least 70 First Nations and various Métis communities. It contains 782 reserves, settlements and villages, many of which are located in the southern half of the province. Reserves in Saskatchewan were created between 1874 and 1906 by Treaties 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10. As of 2016, 47.5 per cent of the province’s 114,570 self-identified First Nations peoples live on reserves, a percentage comparable to the province of Manitoba. Most of the remaining 47 per cent who reside off-reserve in Saskatchewan live in the cities of Saskatoon, Regina and Prince Albert.

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Earthworm

Earthworm, is a segmented worm of phylum Annelida, class Oligochaeta. The class comprises some 14 families, including Lumbricidae, to which the common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) belongs.

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Oriole

   Oriole is the common name for members of 2 families of birds. The Old World family Oriolidae occurs from Europe through Africa and Asia to Australia.

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Rodentia

Rodentia, largest and most common order of mammals, including 29 families, 418 genera and 1793 species. In Canada, 68 of the 163 species of terrestrial mammals are rodents.

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Plant

The shoot system (stem and leaves) grows upward into the light and is the site of photosynthesis; the root system penetrates the soil, anchors the plant and absorbs necessary water and minerals.

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History of Settlement in the Canadian Prairies

The Canadian Prairies were peopled in six great waves of migration, spanning from prehistory to the present. The migration from Asia, about 13,300 years ago, produced an Indigenous population of 20,000 to 50,000 by about 1640. Between 1640 and 1840, several thousand European and Canadian fur traders arrived, followed by several hundred British immigrants. They created dozens of small outposts and a settlement in the Red River Colony, where the Métis became the largest part of the population. The third wave, from the 1840s to the 1890s, consisted mainly but not solely of Canadians of British heritage. The fourth and by far the largest wave was drawn from many nations, mostly European. It occurred from 1897 to 1929, with a pause (1914–22) during and after the First World War. The fifth wave, drawn from other Canadian provinces and from Europe and elsewhere, commenced in the late 1940s. It lasted through the 1960s. The sixth wave, beginning in the 1970s, drew especially upon peoples of the southern hemisphere. It has continued, with fluctuations, to the present. Throughout the last century, the region has also steadily lost residents, as a result of migration to other parts of Canada, to the United States, and elsewhere.