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Theatre Design to 1950

Canada's earliest theatre buildings are known only through written accounts and other archival sources. The first is thought to have been the New Grand Theatre, erected in 1789 for the British military garrison in Halifax.

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Music in Vancouver

British Columbia metropolis: Canada's most important Pacific port and third largest city. Settled in 1862, Vancouver had several early names: Hastings Mills and Gastown (both 1867) and Granville (1870).

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Gerry Schwartz (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on 8 March 1999. Partner content is not updated.

The big black Mercedes glides past the beds of gold- and wine-coloured chrysanthemums that spruce up Toronto's business district in early fall. Quickly and discreetly it transports Gerry Schwartz from his Onex Corp.

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JoJo Savard (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 4, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Ever since she burst onto the late, late-night airwaves in May, 1994, a startling apparition in a flurry of blond ponytails and purple ruffles, the Quebec astrologer has become a celebrity of a distinctly 1990s variety.

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Edmonton Grads

The Edmonton Grads (1915–40) was a women’s championship basketball team coached by Percy Page. During their 25 years as a team, the Grads won an astounding 95 per cent of their matches. The Grads were national and world champions, often defeating their opponents by lopsided scores. The team won the Underwood International Trophy (USA–Canada) for 17 years straight (1923 to 1940), and was undefeated in 24 matches held in conjunction with the Olympic Summer Games in 1924, 1928 and 1936. The Grads were named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2017.

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Canada’s Centennial Celebrations, 1967

Celebrations, activities and events of all kinds were held across Canada in 1967 to mark the 100th anniversary of Confederation, and promote the country’s achievements, history and cultural heritage. The federal Centennial Commission funded thousands of special events and activities, such as the Centennial Train and Caravans, the Centennial Medal, and numerous music and sporting events across the nation. A focus of Centennial Year was the immensely successful Expo 67 World’s Fair in Montréal, which was visited by 50 million people. In addition, provinces, municipalities, businesses and individuals undertook thousands of events that contributed to a national mood of excitement and optimism.

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Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF)

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) runs annually for 10 days in September beginning on the Thursday after Labour Day. The largest film festival in North America, its international stature is second only to the Cannes Film Festival. Unlike most major film festivals, which are open only to members of the industry and media, TIFF’s status as a public festival has made it an ideal testing ground for a film’s commercial appeal. That, combined with its September schedule, has made it a major launching pad for Oscar contenders and the more serious fare of the fall film schedule. It has also proven to be a key showcase for Canadian cinema, documentary films and experimental works. The 2016 edition of TIFF featured 397 films (296 features and 101 shorts), 138 of which were world premieres, while the 2017 lineup was streamlined by 20 per cent.

Article

Harry Freedman

Harry Freedman (b Henryk Frydmann). Composer, english hornist, educator, b Lodz, Poland, 5 Apr 1922, naturalized Canadian 1932, d Toronto 16 Sep 2005.

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Authors and Their Milieu

Contemporary Canadian writers have won prestigious awards and honours at home and abroad. Among the most publicized of these events was Prix Goncourt awarded to Antonine Maillet for Pélagie-la-Charette.

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Anne of Green Gables

Lucy Maud Montgomery’s first novel, Anne of Green Gables (1908), became an instant bestseller and has remained in print for more than a century, making the character of Anne Shirley a mythic icon of Canadian culture. The book has sold an estimated 50 million copies worldwide, been translated into at least 36 languages, as well as braille, and been adapted more than two dozen times in various mediums. A musical version first produced by the Charlottetown Festival in 1965 is the longest running annual musical theatre production in the world, while the award-winning 1985 CBC miniseries starring Megan Follows is the most-watched television program in Canadian history. Thousands of tourists visit Prince Edward Island each year to see the “sacred sites” related to the book, and the sale of Anne-related commodities such as souvenirs and dolls has come to constitute a cottage industry.

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Prince Charles (HRH The Prince of Wales)

His Royal Highness (HRH) The Prince of Wales (Prince Charles), heir to the thrones of Canada, the United Kingdom and 13 other Commonwealth realms (born 14 November 1948 in London, United Kingdom). Charles is the eldest son of Her Majesty (HM) The Queen (1926–) and His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of Edinburgh (Prince Philip) (1921–2021) and has been the heir since his mother’s accession to the British and Commonwealth thrones in 1952. The Prince of Wales is honorary Colonel-in-Chief of seven Canadian military regiments and patron or president of more than 400 charitable organizations worldwide, including Prince’s Trust Canada.

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Canadian's Claim of Everest Ascent Disputed

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 27, 2006. Partner content is not updated.

On a bright morning six years ago, through a wind-chopped audio feed sent from the heart of the Nepalese Himalayas, thousands of Canadians listened in on the most important moment of Byron Smith's life. "I'm 30 steps from the summit," he advised in a radio call relayed by satellite to CBC Newsworld.