Search for "maple syrup"

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Maple Syrup Industry

Canada is the world’s leading producer and exporter of maple products, accounting for 71 per cent of the global market. In 2016, Canadian producers exported 45 million kg of maple products, with a value of $381 million. The province of Québec is by far the largest producer, representing 92 per cent of Canadian production. Maple syrup and maple sugar products are made by boiling down the sap of maple trees. World production of maple syrup and sugar is mainly limited to the Maple Belt, the hardwood forest stretching from the midwestern United States through Ontario, Québec and New England and into New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island; however, British Columbia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan also produce some syrup.

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Tarte au sucre

Nearly all of Québec’s earliest immigrants were peasant or artisan settlers who came from the west of France; the culture and cuisine of Québec are almost entirely rooted in that tradition.

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Valérie

Valérie (1969), the first of a group of erotic films now known as "maple-syrup porno," launched the career of director Denis HÉROUX.

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Pouding Chômeur

​The Québécois dessert called pouding chômeur — poor man’s pudding, or more literally, pudding of the unemployed — is delectably rich and incredibly simple.

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Maple Trees in Canada

Maples are trees and shrubs in the genus Acer, previously classified within the maple family Aceraceae, but now placed by some taxonomists in Sapindaceae (Soapberry family), which also includes horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastaneum). There are approximately 150 species of maple around the world, most in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere, and the majority native to eastern Asia. Ten maple species are native to Canada, perhaps the best known being sugar maple (Acer saccharum) of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. The Canadian flag displays a stylized maple leaf, and maple is Canada’s official arboreal emblem. Maples are not only important to Canada symbolically, they are also ecologically and economically significant.

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Plessisville

Plessisville is named after Joseph-Octave Plessis, the eleventh bishop of Québec City. Plessisville was the first municipality developed in the Bois-Francs area. It had a rich, fertile soil ideal for agricultural development.

Editorial

Canadian Comfort Food

For most Canadians, the holidays, and the long winter that follows, are all about spending time with family — and eating. For this occasion, we’ve put together articles that trace the histories of seven classic, and idiosyncratically Canadian comfort foods hailing from the prairies to Québec to Newfoundland. And we’re not only providing you with the history and cultural context of each dish, we’re also providing the recipes so you can make them at home. Enjoy!

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Sugar Industry

Sugar Industry, a sector of Canada's FOOD AND BEVERAGE INDUSTRIES composed of companies that make cane, beet and invert sugars, sucrose syrup, molasses and beet pulp.

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Butter Tart

With its vast spaces and long history of immigration and Indigenous peoples, it's not easy to define Canadian cuisine. Be that as it may, the butter tart is quintessentially Canadian.

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St Joseph Island

St Joseph Island, 370 km2, lies at the east entrance of the ST MARYS RIVER in the North Channel connecting Lakes HURON and SUPERIOR, about 30 km southeast of Sault Ste Marie, Ont. The island is the most westerly section of the Canadian portion of the NIAGARA ESCARPMENT.

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Elmira

Elmira, Ontario, urban area, population 9931 (2011c), 8872 (2006c). Elmira is located about 17 km northwest of KITCHENER-WATERLOO.

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Saint-Quentin

Saint-Quentin, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 2095 (2011c), 2250 (2006c). The Town of Saint-Quentin is located in northern New Brunswick in the Appalachian Highlands between the RESTIGOUCHE and MIRAMICHI rivers and tributaries of the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Sustainable Development

Sustainable development has been defined by the United Nations (UN) as development that “meets the needs of the present” while ensuring the future sustainability of the planet, its people and its resources. Meeting these needs often requires balancing three key features of sustainable development: environmental protection, economic growth and social inclusion. The goals of sustainable development are interconnected. The most successful sustainable development projects will include environmental, economic and social considerations in their final plan. These considerations must include the free, prior and informed consent of any Indigenous groups impacted by a sustainable development project.

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Lennoxville

The Abenaki and the French missionaries often used the site because it was a focal point for canoes and small boats using the tributaries of the Saint-François. A sawmill and forest products plant (lumber and potash) preceded the founding of the first village by LOYALISTS around 1794.

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Ann Mortifee

Mortifee, Ann. Composer, singer, actress, b Durban, South Africa, 30 Nov 1947, naturalized Canadian 1961; BA (British Columbia) 1968. While studying English 1964-8 at the University of British Columbia, she began her career as a folk and blues singer-guitarist at the Bunkhouse.

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Hupacasath (Opetchesaht)

The Hupacasath (Hupač̓asatḥ, formerly Opetchesaht) are a Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation residing in the Alberni Valley, Vancouver Island, BC. According to the nation, Hupacasath means “people residing above the water.” In September 2018, the federal government reported that there were 332 registered members of the Hupacasath Nation.

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Festivals

Festivals began in antiquity as religious and ritual observance of the seasons, often including sacred community meals or feasts. Today, festivals are held to commemorate, celebrate or re-enact events and seasons.