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Guy Paul Morin Case

The Guy Paul Morin case was the second major wrongful conviction case to occur in the modern era of the Canadian criminal justice system. The case was riddled with official errors — from inaccurate eyewitness testimony and police tunnel vision, to scientific bungling and the suppression of evidence. Morin had been acquitted of the murder of nine-year-old Christine Jessop in 1986, only to be found guilty at a retrial in 1992. He was cleared by DNA evidence in 1995 and received $1.25 million in compensation. In 2020, DNA evidence identified Calvin Hoover, a Jessop family friend who died in 2015, as the real killer.

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BC Murder Suspects Found Dead After Nationwide Manhunt

Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod were found dead by apparent self-inflicted gunshot wounds in a densely forested area in Northern Manitoba. They had reportedly been dead for several days. The Port Alberni men, both 19, had been the subject of an extensive nationwide manhunt that lasted three weeks. They were suspected of murdering American Lucas Fowler, 23, and Australian Chynna Deese, 24, four days before also killing UBC professor Leonard Dyck, 64, in Northern BC. Schmegelsky and McLeod had been formally charged with Dyck’s murder and were the lead suspects in the deaths of Fowler and Deese. The murders had drawn international attention.  

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17 People Shot in Toronto Over Long Weekend

Toronto police scrambled to deal with 14 shooting incidents in five different neighbourhoods over the August long weekend. Seventeen people were injured. The violence led to renewed calls for a handgun ban in Toronto, including from Mayor John Tory. Former Toronto police chief Bill Blair, now the minister of border security and organized crime reduction, did not rule out a ban but said that more consultation was required.

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Mistrial Declared in Dennis Oland Murder Trial

A month after a suitable jury was selected for the re-trial of Moosehead scion Dennis Oland, a judge declared a mistrial due to improper background checks of potential jurors conducted by a Saint John police officer. Oland’s re-trial, which followed the overturning of his conviction for second degree murder by the New Brunswick Court of Appeal in October 2016, began on 21 November 2018, and was conducted by a judge alone.

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Robert Pickton Case

Between 1978 and 2001, at least 65 women disappeared from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Robert Pickton, who operated a pig farm in nearby Port Coquitlam, was charged with murdering 26 of the women. He was convicted on six charges and sentenced to life in prison. In a jail cell conversation with an undercover police officer, Pickton claimed to have murdered 49 women. The murders led to the largest serial killer investigation in Canadian history, and Pickton’s farm became the largest crime scene in Canadian history. The case became a flash point in the wider issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. In 2012, a provincial government inquiry into the case concluded that “blatant failures” by police — including inept criminal investigative work, compounded by police and societal prejudice against sex trade workers and Indigenous women ­— led to a “tragedy of epic proportions.”

This article contains sensitive material that may not be suitable for all audiences.

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Dennis Oland Found Not Guilt of Murdering Father

Dennis Oland, the heir to the Moosehead Breweries empire run by his father, Richard Oland, was found not guilty of murdering his father. Richard was found beaten to death in his office in July 2011. Dennis was found guilty of second-degree murder in December 2015, but that conviction was overturned in 2016 and a new trial was ordered. The second trial was conducted by a judge alone after prosecutors and police were found to have engaged in improper jury selection procedures.  

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Resources for BC Killers’ Manhunt Should be Available for MMIWG Cases, Advocates Say

As the hunt for two teens suspected of murdering three tourists in BC intensified, Indigenous rights advocates openly questioned why such extensive resources are not utilized in cases of murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls. In response to the killing of three tourists in Northern BC, which drew international attention, the RCMP coordinated a search that involved different police forces and the Canadian Armed Forces. Armoured vehicles, drones, K9 units, all-terrain vehicles, boats and military and civilian aircraft were utilized. “It is a little bit eyebrow-raising because of the different response,” said Sheila North, a former grand chief. “Families that do their own searches are feeling a little bit let down and not respected in the same way as these other families are.”