Search for "Nunavut"

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Willie Adams

Willie Adams, Inuk, Liberal senator, businessman, electrician (born 22 June 1934 in Kuujjuaq [then Fort Chimo] in Nunavik, Quebec). As Canada’s first Inuit senator, Adams frequently sought greater federal government support for his people in education, health care, infrastructure, land claims, fishery allocations and affordable food, housing and fuel. He was actively involved in the creation of Nunavut and supported Inuit language rights, art and culture, and traditional hunting methods such as sealing.

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Inuksuk (Inukshuk)

Inuksuk (also spelled inukshuk, plural inuksuit) is a figure made of piled stones or boulders constructed to communicate with humans throughout the Arctic.

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Inuit

Inuit — Inuktitut for “the people” — are an Indigenous people, the majority of whom inhabit the northern regions of Canada. An Inuit person is known as an Inuk. The Inuit homeland is known as Inuit Nunangat, which refers to the land, water and ice contained in the Arctic region.

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Aqjangajuk Shaa

Aqjangajuk Shaa

Aqjangajuk Shaa (Axangayu), Inuit artist (born at Shartoweetuk camp near Cape Dorset, Nunavut 17 March 1937; died 2019). Aqjangajuk, who began carving in stone in the 1950s, did not do a great deal of detailing; instead he worked for a total effect, concentrating on spatial interaction, expressive qualities and overall form. While some of his carvings of human and animal subjects are compact, robust, solid and static, others are more open, outwardly thrusting, dynamic forms. His only print, Wounded Caribou (1961), is a very effective portrayal of an animal stricken by a hunter's arrow.