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Royal Newfoundland Regiment

The Newfoundland Regiment was established in September 1914 and served overseas during the First World War. It was redesignated the Royal Newfoundland Regiment in 1918. The regiment served in the Gallipoli (or Dardanelles) campaign, and in France and Belgium. It suffered heavy casualties during the Battle of Beaumont-Hamel on 1 July 1916; more than 80 per cent of the regiment was either killed or wounded. The regiment was disbanded in 1919. In 1949, after Newfoundland entered into confederation with Canada, the Newfoundland Regiment was re-established as a Royal Canadian Infantry Corps reserve regiment.

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John Shiwak

John Shiwak (Sikoak), Inuit hunter, trapper, soldier (born February or March 1889 in Cul-de-Sac, near Rigolet, Labrador; died 21 November 1917 near Masnières, France). Shiwak was one of more than 60 men from Labrador who joined the military during the First World War. He went on to become one of the best scouts and snipers on the Western Front.

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First World War (WWI)

The First World War of 1914–1918 was the bloodiest conflict in Canadian history, taking the lives of nearly 61,000 Canadians. It erased romantic notions of war, introducing slaughter on a massive scale, and instilled a fear of foreign military involvement that would last until the Second World War. The great achievements of Canadian soldiers on battlefields such as Ypres, Vimy and Passchendaele, however, ignited a sense of national pride and a confidence that Canada could stand on its own, apart from the British Empire, on the world stage. The war also deepened the divide between French and English Canada and marked the beginning of widespread state intervention in society and the economy.

(This is the full-length entry about the First World War. For a plain-language summary, please see First World War (Plain-Language Summary).)